Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




TECH SPACE
"Sifting" Liquid at the Cellular Level
by Staff Writers
Philadelphia PA (SPX) Jul 18, 2012


The carbon nanotubes used in this study measure as small as 70 nanometers in outer diameter and are currently the smallest chromatography columns ever made. The carbon nanotube columns are mechanically robust and are able to withstand repeated bending and compression.

Drexel University engineers continue to drive research into the use of carbon nanotubes, straw-like structures that are more than 1,000 times thinner than a single human hair. Their most recent development uses the tiny tubes to separate liquids within a solution. The researchers have shown that individual carbon nanotubes can act as a separation channel that would force two differing molecules to separate as easily as oil and water.

For example, the molecules that comprise two chemically distinct liquids will interact differently with the walls of the nanotube as the liquids flow through it. This will cause one of the liquids to drain through the nanoscale straw faster than the other, thus forcing a separation between the two liquids.

This technology could prove useful in a number of applications, including forensic studies with very small sample sizes and studying molecules extracted from individual cells. Forensic experts would be able to analyze trace evidence, even down to a single cell or invisible stains.

"We believe that this research will lead to development of tools for analysis on single living cells and push the limits of analytical chemistry to even smaller scales and to single organelle columns," said Dr. Yury Gogotsi, director of the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute.

Gogotsi and Dr. Gary Friedman, director of the Drexel Plasma Medicine Lab and a professor of electrical and computer engineering, were the lead researchers on a study about applications of nanotubes for cellular chromatography that was recently published in Nature Publishing Group's Scientific Reports.

The research was funded by a grant from W.M. Keck Foundation and the National Science Foundation's National Interdisciplinary Research Teams program.

The carbon nanotubes used in this study measure as small as 70 nanometers in outer diameter and are currently the smallest chromatography columns ever made. The carbon nanotube columns are mechanically robust and are able to withstand repeated bending and compression.

These characteristics are vital for applications at the cellular level, as the tiny tubes' durability allows them to penetrate cell membranes.

Continued nanotube research by Drexel engineers will examine the development of electrochemical and optical tools. The full text of the report can be viewed here.

.


Related Links
Drexel University
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Sailing with nerves of glass
Berlin, Germany (SPX) Jul 18, 2012
In the world of racing, tiny details can be the difference between victory and defeat. It is no wonder, then, that manufacturers of racing yachts are always on the lookout for new technologies to optimize boats and sails. An ingenious new sensor technology now helps them to extend the boundaries of what is possible. The constant hunger to break new records has turned boat building into a high-te ... read more


TECH SPACE
ESA to catch laser beam from Moon mission

Researchers Estimate Ice Content of Crater at Moon's South Pole

Researchers find evidence of ice content at the moon's south pole

Nanoparticles found in moon glass bubbles explain weird lunar soil behaviour

TECH SPACE
Opportunity Continues to Explore Rocks on the Rim of Endeavour Crater

Orbiter Enters, Then Exits, Standby Safe Mode

NASA's Mars rover two weeks from landing

Developing Technologies For Living Off the Land...In Space

TECH SPACE
Inflatable Spacecraft Heat Shield Set to Launch

Ambitious ISRO enhancing India's space capabilities

Titanic II to have 'safety deck': Australian tycoon

Me and My Spacesuit

TECH SPACE
Astronauts in good shape after return

Shenzhou mission sparks 'science fever'

China Beats Russia on Space Launches

China open to cooperation

TECH SPACE
Joyful crews unite aboard space station

Russian Space Lab Launch Delayed Again

Russian rocket launches new crew to space

Science, Maintenance for Station Crew; Launch Preps for New Crew Members

TECH SPACE
NASA Selects Launch Services Contract for Jason-3 Mission

NASA Selects Launch Services Contract for Three Missions

NASA Selects ULA's Workhorse Delta II Rocket for Three Future Missions

SpaceX Completes Design Review of Dragon

TECH SPACE
Can Astronomers Detect Exoplanet Oceans

The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing Dust

Study in Nature sheds new light on planet formation

New Instrument Sifts Through Starlight to Reveal New Worlds

TECH SPACE
Heat is Source of 'Pioneer Anomaly'

To Extinguish a Hot Flame, DARPA Studied Cold Plasma

Sailing with nerves of glass

Scientists from northern Germany produce the lightest material in the world




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement