Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




ROBO SPACE
Robots Learn To Follow
by Staff Writers
Davis CA (SPX) Sep 01, 2008


Rather than have the lead robot signal the follower directly, the research team sent "behavioral cues" to the follower via wireless link. Effectively, the cues told the robot, "the leader might be about to turn right" or "might be about to turn left." To develop a decision on how to move, the follower robot was programmed to take into account the lead robot's behavioral cues and the follower's prediction of the lead robot's movement, based on the leader's current speed and direction.

Whether driving on the highway or walking down the street, we pick up on both deliberate signals and unconscious cues to predict what other people are going to do and act accordingly. But robots have trouble following each other around, for example, when a leader turns a corner and disappears from sight.

Researchers at UC Davis have come up with a control system that allows a robot to pick up on cues that the leader is about to turn, predict where it is going and follow it.

"The following problem is a quite fundamental problem in robotics," said Sanjay Joshi, associate professor of mechanical and aeronautical engineering at UC Davis. Robots that are better at following could be easier for people to work with, he said. A hospital robot could follow a doctor around the wards.

Humans use signals and unconscious cues to build a model that predicts where other people are going. Behavioral studies show that people unconsciously turn their heads a fraction of a second before making a left or right turn.

Joshi and his team of researchers developed a control system that could take such behavioral cues into account in making decisions about which way to move.

Joshi, graduate student Michael Chueh, and undergraduate students William Au Yeung and Calvin Lei tested the system using a small commercially available robot, the Evolution Robotics Scorpion. The robot's camera could identify a target on the lead robot, and the robot's onboard computer could combine the target information with behavioral cue information.

Rather than have the lead robot signal the follower directly, the research team sent "behavioral cues" to the follower via wireless link. Effectively, the cues told the robot, "the leader might be about to turn right" or "might be about to turn left."

To develop a decision on how to move, the follower robot was programmed to take into account the lead robot's behavioral cues and the follower's prediction of the lead robot's movement, based on the leader's current speed and direction.

Robots that incorporated behavioral information into their decisions performed much better at following the leader around corners than others, the researchers found.

"We think that if we can embed these cues in control systems, we can make following more reliable," Joshi said.

.


Related Links
UC Davis
All about the robots on Earth and beyond!






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ROBO SPACE
Robot-assisted surgery repairs fistulas
Winston-Salem, N.C. (UPI) Aug 20, 2008
U.S. urologic surgeons say they have successfully used robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery to repair abnormal openings between the bladder and vagina. A team led by Dr. Ashok Hemal, a urologic surgeon from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, used the surgical procedure to repair the abnormal openings that are known as fistulas. Reporting on their experience with seven ... read more


ROBO SPACE
NASA Seeks Input For Commercial Lunar Communications And Navigation

China's First Lunar Probe Satellite Normal After Eclipse

A Flash Of Insight: LCROSS Mission Update

India Postpones First Lunar Mission Until Mid-October

ROBO SPACE
NASA Mars Rover Opportunity Ascends To Level Ground

Phoenix Mission Conducting Extended Activities On Mars

Taking The Opportunity To Escape From Crater Victoria

Antarctic Research Helps Shed Light On Climate Change On Mars

ROBO SPACE
Mapping The Planets, The Moons And The Asteroids

Ares Progress Report For August

Elegant Resorts And Virgin Galactic Make Space Travel A Reality

Going Looney In Space

ROBO SPACE
China to launch Venezuela's first satellite: Chavez

China's Space Ambitions

Rocket For China's Manned Space Mission At Launch Center

China To Release 700 Hours Of Chang'e-1 Data

ROBO SPACE
Computer virus goes into orbit

ISS Orbit Adjusted To Dodge Space Junk

ISS Program Facing Hard Choices

US-Russia chill threatens NASA space program

ROBO SPACE
Arianespace To Launch Koreasat 6

Inmarsat Selects ILS Proton To Launch S-Band Satellite For Europe

Forecast International Projects 50 Billion Dollar ELV Market

Successful Launch For Third Inmarsat-4 Satellite

ROBO SPACE
Universally Speaking, Earthlings Share A Nice Neighborhood

An Interstellar Mission Scenario

Computer Simulations Show How Special The Solar System Is

Twinkle, Twinkle Alien Ocean

ROBO SPACE
Eyes turn to dawn of 'visual computing'

NPL To Create Encyclopedia For Space Nanomaterials

Key Advance Toward Micro-Spacecraft

MIT's Lincoln Lab Upgrades Sputnik-Era Antenna




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement