Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




ICE WORLD
Plunge in CO2 put the freeze on Antarctica
by Staff Writers
Sydney, Australia (SPX) Dec 09, 2011


File image.

Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels plunged by 40% before and during the formation of the Antarctic ice sheet 34 million years ago, according to a new study. The finding helps solve a long-standing scientific puzzle and confirms the power of CO2 to dramatically alter global climate.

The study by an international team, published in the journal Science, is the first multidisciplinary research of its kind to show that CO2 was tracking global cooling at that time. It confirms that significant falls in the greenhouse gas result in global cooling, just as rises result in global warming.

Previous studies had suggested that atmospheric CO2 over the Southern Ocean was climbing during the Eocene to Oligocene climate transition, when ice first formed over Antarctica. This presented a conundrum, suggesting the climate was warming at the same time as Antarctica was freezing.

But when the vastly different ancient Southern Ocean currents and temperatures of that period were factored in, it quickly became apparent that Antarctica's big freeze followed a fall in CO2 levels.

The paper, "The Role of Carbon Dioxide During the Onset of Antarctic Glaciation", reinforces carbon dioxide's place as a primary driver for global temperatures. It was lead authored by Mark Pagani, of Yale University, and co-authored by University of NSW Climate Change Research Centre researcher Dr Willem Sijp.

"Our research recognised that the flows of deep ocean currents at the end of the Eocene were dramatically different from those of today because of the altered position and shape of continental masses," said Dr Sijp.

"Previous research relied on different temperature estimates and had also not taken these different currents into account. This led to significant upward biases in calculated CO2 which made it appear that carbon dioxide was actually increasing around the Southern Ocean as the Antarctic ice sheet formed. We can now see the reverse was true.

"We found a 40 percent CO2 decrease over a three million year period, in agreement with global cooling during that time.

"This decline was a critical condition for global cooling and the emergence of the Antarctic ice sheet. In short, the apparent increase of CO2 during Antarctic glaciation is refuted."

The nature of ocean currents is vital in calculating atmospheric CO2, because the estimates of atmospheric carbon dioxide are derived from measurements of molecules from algae deposited on the ocean floor at six ocean sites millions of years ago.

The fundamentally different circulation of the Southern Ocean during the Eocene directly affected the algae by changing the temperatures of these ocean currents and significantly lowering the nutrient load. This had a direct impact on the inferred CO2.

.


Related Links
University of New South Wales
Beyond the Ice Age






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ICE WORLD
Tropical sea temperatures influence melting in Antarctica
Seattle WA (SPX) Dec 08, 2011
Accelerated melting of two fast-moving outlet glaciers that drain Antarctic ice into the Amundsen Sea Embayment is likely the result, in part, of an increase in sea-surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean, according to new University of Washington research. Higher-than-normal sea-level pressure north of the Amundsen Sea sets up westerly winds that push surface water away from th ... read more


ICE WORLD
Hundreds of NASA's moon rocks missing: audit

Schafer Corp Signs Licensing Agreement with MoonDust Technologies

Russia wants to focus on Moon if Mars mission fails

Flying over the three-dimensional Moon

ICE WORLD
Russia may join European Mars mission

Failed Mars probe to fall to Earth

New Tool for Touring Mars Using Detailed Images

Mars Opportunity Rover Finds Rich Vein Of Gypsum Water Deposits

ICE WORLD
Ball Aerospace Delivers Orion Phased Array Antenna EDUs

Voyager Hits New Region at Solar System Edge

Ugandan works on space project from mother's backyard

Nanosail-D Sails Home

ICE WORLD
China honors its 'father' of space efforts

Philatelic Cover Reveals the secret names of second Taikonaut team

First Crew for Tiangong

China post office offers letters from space

ICE WORLD
Astronaut TJ Creamer Learns Space Station Science From the Ground Up

FLEX-ible Insight Into Flame Behavior

Growing Knowledge in Space

MDA to extend its services to support Canadarm2 and Dextre for ISS

ICE WORLD
SpaceX mission to space station set for February

Boeing Receives USAF Reusable Booster System Contract

Soyuz' second mission from French Guiana is readied at the Spaceport

On the record with Arianespace

ICE WORLD
Giant Super-Earths Made Of Diamond Are Possible

New Planet Kepler-21b discovery a partnership of both space and ground-based observations

Astronomers Find Goldilocks Planet and Others

The Habitable Exoplanets Catalog, a new online database of habitable worlds

ICE WORLD
Researchers find best routes to self-assembling 3D shapes

Avatars develop real world skills

Tablets, e=readers closing book on ink-and-paper era

New insights into how the brain reconstructs the third dimension




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement