Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




IRON AND ICE
NASA aims to land on, capture asteroids within next 15 years
by Staff Writers
Moscow (Voice of Russia) May 19, 2014


One current problem is the tools: reliable Earth tools like a hammer and nails are not adequate in space because of the problems created by an astronaut swinging a heavy weight in front of his thin glass face shield. Another issue is that the necessary spacesuit has yet to be developed. Walking on the moon and climbing on an asteroid are two very different actions, making it necessary for a spacesuit to be durable and dynamic.

NASA researchers are at work developing a plan that not only hopes to physically place astronauts on an asteroid for the first time, but also to wrangle a space object and place it in the orbit of the Earth's moon.

The project is not scheduled to be complete until the 2020s, although prospective astronauts are already preparing for the low gravity mission by training underwater - the most similar circumstances scientists can simulate on earth. They have also finished a replica of the Orion spacecraft, which will transport astronauts to the asteroid.

"We're working on the techniques and tools we might use someday to explore a small asteroid that was captured from an orbit around the sun and brought back by a robotic spacecraft to orbit around the moon," Stan Love, one of the astronauts training in the 40-foot deep pool, said in a NASA statement.

"When it's there, we can send people there to take samples and take a look at it up close. That's our main task; we're looking at tools we'd use for that, how we'd take those samples."

Scientists hope that if they are able to extract samples from an asteroid it will be made up of layers, which could then provide some insight into the current state of the solar system, possibly even information about how it was formed.

One current problem is the tools: reliable Earth tools like a hammer and nails are not adequate in space because of the problems created by an astronaut swinging a heavy weight in front of his thin glass face shield. Another issue is that the necessary spacesuit has yet to be developed. Walking on the moon and climbing on an asteroid are two very different actions, making it necessary for a spacesuit to be durable and dynamic.

"We need some significant modifications to make it easy to translate," astronaut Steve Bowen said of the spacesuit, as quoted by NASA. "I can't stretch my arms out quite as far as in the [space station suit]. The work envelop is very small. So as we get through, we look at these tasks. These tasks are outstanding to help us develop what needs to be modified in the suit, as well."

The quiet announcement comes two years after a group of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs made waves by telling the public that they hope to develop robotic spacecraft capable of extracting valuable minerals from asteroids. With financial backing from Google bosses Eric Schmidt and Larry Page, as well as British billionaire Richard Branson, the so-called Planetary Resources group was touted as "the future of entrepreneurial space."

Now, the group has dialed back some of the rhetoric and admitted its new goal is to find water on or near asteroids and process it into fuel that could be used to preserve aging commercial satellites, according to The Wall Street Journal.

"I still consider that mining," Planetary Resources co-founder Eric Anderson told the newspaper. "We're going to take the resources of space and turn them into a usable material."

Both initiatives could use some help when it comes to identifying exactly which asteroids could work. Last year, NASA asked for the public's help in scoping out some of the 99 percent of asteroids measuring 30 to 40 meters in size - which would be large enough to devastate a city - that have yet to be found.

The initiative was inspired by the 18-meter asteroid that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia in February and will almost certainly assist the plan to land on an asteroid in outer space, according to NASA chief engineer Brian Muirhead.

"What we need to do is increase the frequency of identification of asteroids such that we can also track them and characterize them," Muirhead told National Geographic. "That will give us a choice [to see] which [asteroid] we want to grab hold of and bring back to the earth-moon system."

Source: Voice of Russia

.


Related Links
NASA
Asteroid and Comet Mission News, Science and Technology






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





IRON AND ICE
NASA Astronauts Go Underwater to Test Tools for a Mission to an Asteroid
Houston TX (SPX) May 13, 2014
NASA is planning to send astronauts to an asteroid in the 2020s, and preparations are already being made. Stan Love and Steve Bowen have between them spent more than 62 hours in the vacuum of space on nine shuttle mission spacewalks, and they're putting that experience to use here on Earth by helping engineers determine what astronauts will need on NASA's next step toward Deep Space. Weari ... read more


IRON AND ICE
LRO View of Earth

Saturn in opposition tonight, will appear next to the moon

Russia to begin Moon colonization in 2030

Astrobotic Partners With NASA To Develop Robotic Lunar Landing Capability

IRON AND ICE
When fantasy becomes reality: first seeds to be planted soon on Mars

NASA's Saucer-Shaped Craft Preps for Flight Test

Construction to Begin on NASA Mars Lander Scheduled to Launch in 2016

NASA Mars Rover Curiosity Wrapping Up Waypoint Work

IRON AND ICE
Britain's Longitude Prize back after 300-year absence

Sea level rise forces US space agency to retreat

A light-speed voyage to the distant future

US spacecraft enters giant asteroid's orbit

IRON AND ICE
Moon rover Yutu comes closer to public

The Phantom Tiangong

New satellite launch center to conduct joint drill

China issues first assessment on space activities

IRON AND ICE
New ISS Expedition Unaffected by Proton Crash

US-Russian Tensions Roiling Outer Space Cooperation

Scientists Seek Answers With Space Station Thyroid Cancer Study

Rounding up the BCATs on the ISS

IRON AND ICE
SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft returns to Earth from space station

SpaceX-3 Mission To Return Dragon's Share of Space Station Science

Third-stage engine glitch causes Proton-M accident

Russia's Roscosmos plans to launch two more Protons this year

IRON AND ICE
Starshade Could Help Photograph Distant Planets

Giant telescope tackles orbit and size of exoplanet

Odd planet, so far from its star

New Exomoon Hunting Technique Could Find Solar System-like Moons

IRON AND ICE
China says space debris recovered: report

MIPT Experts Reveal the Secret of Radiation Vulnerability

Physicists say they know how to turn light into matter

Australians report flaming object falling from sky




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.