Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. 24/7 Space News .




SHAKE AND BLOW
Mount Hood study suggests volcano eruptibility is rare
by Staff Writers
Davis CA (SPX) Feb 20, 2014


Rocks ejected from Mt. Hood show that the magma under the volcano has been liquid enough to erupt for less than 10 percent of the last 20,000 years. If generally true, this could have implications for understanding when a volcano is most ready to erupt. Image courtesy Eric Klemetti, Denison University.

Forecasts of when a volcano is ready to erupt could be a little closer thanks to work by geologists at the University of California, Davis, and Oregon State University published online Feb. 16 in the journal Nature.

For an eruption to occur, the magma, or molten rock under the volcano must be sufficiently mobile to erupt.

"The question is, what percentage of time is the magma in an eruptible state?" said Kari Cooper, associate professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at UC Davis and lead author on the paper.

"People think about there being this big reservoir of liquid magma under a volcano, but we don't think it's in that state all the time," she said.

The mobility of the magma depends on the amount of crystallization: When it is more than about 50 percent crystalline, it becomes immobile. Crystallization, in turn, depends on the temperature of the rock.

Until now, volcanologists have not known how common it is for magma to be crystalline compared to being mobile and eruptible. The new work shows that at least for Mount Hood, Ore., the magma is mobile less than 10 percent, and perhaps as little as one percent of the time.

Cooper and Adam Kent, professor of geology at Oregon State University, studied rocks ejected from previous eruptions at Mount Hood. By analyzing both radioactive isotopes and the distribution of trace elements, they were able to reconstruct the history of the rocks and the conditions to which they had been exposed before they were erupted from the volcano.

The results mean that volcanologists might be able to better assess when a volcano is ready to erupt by using seismic or other remote imaging to look for mostly liquid magma, Cooper said. If eruptible magma is indeed relatively rare, then when it does appear, the risks of an eruption are higher, she said.

Mount Hood is so far the only volcano studied in detail using these techniques. A preliminary survey of data from similar volcanoes around the world shows that they likely follow a similar pattern to Mount Hood, with mobile, "eruptible" magma only being present a small proportion of the time. Cooper and Kent plan further studies to see if these discoveries are widely applicable or unique to Mount Hood.

.


Related Links
University of California - Davis
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





SHAKE AND BLOW
Volcanoes, including Mt. Hood, can go from dormant to active quickly
Corvallis OR (SPX) Feb 18, 2014
A new study suggests that the magma sitting 4-5 kilometers beneath the surface of Oregon's Mount Hood has been stored in near-solid conditions for thousands of years, but that the time it takes to liquefy and potentially erupt is surprisingly short - perhaps as little as a couple of months. The key, scientists say, is to elevate the temperature of the rock to more than 750 degrees Celsius, ... read more


SHAKE AND BLOW
Chang'e-2 lunar probe travels 70 mln km

LADEE Sends Its First Images of the Moon Back to Earth

Source of 'Moon Curse' Revealed by Eclipse

NASA bets on private companies to exploit moon's resources

SHAKE AND BLOW
Curiosity Drives On After Crossing Martian Dune

The World Above and Beyond

Mars Rover Heads Uphill After Solving 'Doughnut' Riddle

'Pinnacle Island' Rock Studies Continue

SHAKE AND BLOW
Inside astronaut Alexander's head

NASA Welcomes University Participants to Develop Science Payloads

Boeing Commercial Crew Program Passes NASA Hardware, Software Reviews

Is truth stranger than fiction? Yes, especially for science fiction

SHAKE AND BLOW
What's up, Yutu

China's Jade Rabbit rover comes 'back to life'

Yutu Awakes

Moon plays trick on Jade Rabbit

SHAKE AND BLOW
NASA, International Space Station Partners Announce Future Crew Members

Andrews Space Cargo Module Power Unit Provides Power For Payloads Bound For ISS

Russian Progress M-22M docks with ISS following fast rendezvous

Russian Resupply Spacecraft Begins Expedited Flight to Station

SHAKE AND BLOW
Lighter engines a headache for satellite launcher Ariane

ILS Proton Successfully Launches TURKSAT-4A for Turksat

Amazonas 4A is prepared for Arianespace's second Ariane 5 flight of 2014

An Early 2014 Surprise - Arianespace Needs More Money

SHAKE AND BLOW
Kepler Finds a Very Wobbly Planet

One planet, two stars: new research shows how circumbinary planets form

First Weather Map of Brown Dwarf

NASA-Sponsored 'Disk Detective' Lets Public Search for New Planetary Nurseries

SHAKE AND BLOW
Google unveils 'Project Tango' 3D smartphone platform

Gecko-inspired Adhesion: Self-cleaning and Reliable

An essential step toward printing living tissues

Single chip device to provide real-time 3D images from inside the heart, blood vessels




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.