Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .

Mixed verdict in Samsung-Apple patent trial
by Staff Writers
San Jose, United States (AFP) May 03, 2014

Jurors late Friday ordered Samsung to pay just a fraction of the big-money damages sought by Apple in a high-stakes Silicon Valley case over smartphone patents.

The jury in federal court in California found that Samsung violated some patents and ruled that the South Korean consumer electronics giant should pay $119.6 million in damages.

Jurors also found credence in counterclaims by Samsung and said Apple should pay its rival $158,400 in damages.

In a statement released to US media, Apple portrayed the verdict as a victory that "reinforces what courts around the world have already found: that Samsung wilfully stole our ideas and copied our products."

Samsung declined to comment, saying it would be "inappropriate" to do so prior to the official end of deliberations, which is expected on Monday after jurors tend to what appeared to be a missing entry in damages calculations on the verdict form.

The outcome is sharply different from a 2012 patent trial in the same court. Unlike the previous case in which Apple was a clear winner, this time Samsung prevailed in many areas.

Apple's legal team had urged jurors to order the South Korean electronics giant to pay more than $2 billion in damages for flagrantly copying iPhone features.

Samsung lawyers maintained that the legal onslaught emerged from a "holy war" Apple declared on Google-made Android software used to power smartphones.

In August 2012, a separate jury in the same court decided that Samsung should pay Apple $1.049 billion in damages for illegally copying iPhone and iPad features, in one of the biggest patent cases in decades.

The damage award was later trimmed to $929 million and is being appealed.

Friday's verdict came after three full days of deliberation in a patent trial that began in early April before US District Judge Lucy Koh in the Silicon Valley city of San Jose.

Patents at issue in the case involve unlocking touchscreens with slide gestures, automatically correcting words being typed, retrieving data sought by users and performing actions on found data such as making a call after coming up with a phone number.

Samsung devices targeted by Apple include more than half a dozen smartphones from the Galaxy line, along with the Galaxy 2 tablet.

Samsung, in a countermove, accused Apple of infringing on patents related to transmitting digital video and storing digital images.

- 'Defensive victory' -

Brian Love, a law professor at Santa Clara University who followed the case, said the outcome "feels like a defensive victory for Samsung, and not a particularly shocking one."

"Though this verdict is large by normal standards, it is hard to view this outcome as much of a victory for Apple," Love told AFP.

"Apple launched this litigation campaign years ago with aspirations of slowing the meteoric rise of Android phone manufacturers. It has so far failed to do so, and this case won't get it any closer."

He noted the award was less than 10 percent the amount requested by Apple and likely just covers the company's legal expenses in the case.

The verdict was also seen as a victory for Google, which was not a party in the case but was billed by Samsung attorneys as Apple's main target.

Samsung's legal team had stressed during trial that Google built the Android mobile operating software that was accused of violating Apple patents.

Google engineers were among witnesses called to testify as Samsung lawyers portrayed the case as an attack on Android, which has become a formidable rival for the software powering Apple smartphones and tablets.

Samsung is the world's leading maker of smartphones and tablets built using Google's free Android mobile operating system and has overtaken Apple in the smartphone market as the legal battle has been playing out between the two giants.

The outcome was very good for Samsung, but Google notched up a win with the verdict, according to patent analyst Florian Mueller of website

The verdict was firm but not final. Koh found a missing royalty amount due to Apple for a Samsung smartphone found to infringe on one of the patents.

Jurors opted to return to court Monday to address the apparent oversight, which was expected to bump up slightly the damages award to Apple.

The judge must sign off on the verdict before it is considered final and it is likely to be appealed.


Related Links
Satellite-based Internet technologies

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Global tablet sales freeze up, survey shows
New York (AFP) May 01, 2014
The global market for tablet computers went into hibernation in early 2014, ending a long run of sizzling growth, a survey showed Thursday. The IDC report said sales of tablets including newly introduced convertible PCs totaled 50.4 million units in the first quarter of 2014. That was just 3.9 percent higher than the same period a year earlier, and down 35.7 percent from the busy holida ... read more

John C. Houbolt, Unsung Hero of the Apollo Program, Dies at Age 95

NASA Completes LADEE Mission with Planned Impact on Moon's Surface

Russia plans to get a foothold in the Moon

Russian Federal Space Agency is elaborating Moon exploration program

Target on Mars Looks Good for NASA Rover Drilling

Mars Rover Switches to Driving Backwards Due to Elevated Wheel Currents

Mission to Mars

Traces of recent water on Mars

NASA Invests in Hundreds of US Small Businesses to Enable Future Missions

Orion Undergoes Simulation Of Intense Launch Vibrations

Orion Exploration Design Challenge Winner Announced

Orion Feels the Vibe During Tests at Kennedy Space Center

China issues first assessment on space activities

China launches experimental satellite

Tiangong's New Mission

"Space Odyssey": China's aspiration in future space exploration

NASA Seeks to Evolve ISS for New Commercial Opportunities

Astronauts Complete Short Spacewalk to Replace Backup Computer

No Official Confirmation of NASA Severing Ties with Russian Space Agency

Astronauts Prep for Spacewalk as Mission Managers Evaluate Busy Schedule

Second O3b satellite cluster delivered for upcoming Arianespace Soyuz launch

Court blocks US plan to buy Russian rocket engines

Arianespace to launch Indonesia satellite BRIsat

It's a "go" for Arianespace's Vega launch with Kazakhstan's first Earth observation satellite

Length of Exoplanet Day Measured for First Time

Spitzer and WISE Telescopes Find Close, Cold Neighbor of Sun

Alien planet's rotation speed clocked for first time

Seven Samples from the Solar System's Birth

High-Strengh Materials from the Pressure Cooker

Faster Dental Treatment with New Photoactive Molecule

Element 117 confirmed by scientists, closer to being officially named

IBM expands cyber-security solutions

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.