Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .

Mining for heat
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) May 04, 2012

File image.

Underground mining is a sweaty job, and not just because of the hard work it takes to haul ore: Mining tunnels fill with heat naturally emitted from the surrounding rock.

A group of researchers from McGill University in Canada has taken a systematic look at how such heat might be put to use once mines are closed. They calculate that each kilometer of a typical deep underground mine could produce 150 kW of heat, enough to warm 5 to 10 Canadian households during off-peak times.

A number of communities in Canada and Europe already use geothermal energy from abandoned mines. Noting these successful, site-specific applications, the McGill research team strove to develop a general model that could be used by engineers to predict the geothermal energy potential of other underground mines.

In a paper accepted for publication in the American Institute of Physics' Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, the researchers analyze the heat flow through mine tunnels flooded with water.

In such situations, hot water from within the mine can be pumped to the surface, the heat extracted, and the cool water returned to the ground. For the system to be sustainable, heat must not be removed more quickly than it can be replenished by the surrounding rock. The team's model can be used to analyze the thermal behavior of a mine under different heat extraction scenarios.

"Abandoned mines demand costly perpetual monitoring and remediating. Geothermal use of the mine will offset these costs and help the mining industry to become more sustainable," says Seyed Ali Ghoreishi Madiseh, lead author on the paper.

The team estimates that up to one million Canadians could benefit from mine geothermal energy, with an even greater potential benefit for more densely populated countries such as Great Britain.

"Sustainable heat extraction from abandoned mine tunnels: a numerical model" is accepted for publication in Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy.


Related Links
American Institute of Physics
Powering The World in the 21st Century at

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Superconducting strip could become an ultra-low-voltage sensor
Heidelberg, Germany (SPX) May 01, 2012
Researchers studying a superconducting strip observed an intermittent motion of magnetic flux which carries vortices inside the regularly spaced weak conducting regions carved into the superconducting material. These vortices resulted in alternating static phases with zero voltage and dynamic phases, which are characterised by non-zero voltage peaks in the superconductor. This study, ... read more

Perigee "Super Moon" On May 5-6

India's second moon mission Chandrayaan-2 to wait

European Google Lunar X Prize Teams Call For Science Payloads

Russia to Send Manned Mission to Moon by 2030

Opportunity's Eighth Anniversary View From Greeley Haven

Studies of 'Amboy' Rock Continue as Solar Energy Improves

New form of Mars lava flow dicovered

100 Days and Counting to NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover Landing

How will the US biotechnology industry benefit from new patent laws?

Space -- the next frontier for Hillary Clinton?

Company to Create 'Gas Stations' in Space

Boeing, NASA Sign Agreement on Mission Support for CST-100

China's Lunar Docking

Shenzhou-9 may take female astronaut to space

China to launch 100 satellites during 2011-15

Three for Tiangong

Space Station's Robotic Crew Member Designed to Look, Move and Work Like a Human

Expedition 30 Lands in Kazakhstan

Three astronauts to land from ISS Friday

Expedition 30 Crew Returning Home Friday

SpaceX delays ISS launch again

500 Students Participate in NASA Student Launch Projects Challenge

A highly symbolic mission is reflected in words and images on Ariane 5's payload fairing

A "mirror image" payload refueling for Arianespace's next Ariane 5 mission

Three Earthlike planets identified by Cornell astronomers

Some Stars Capture Rogue Planets

ALMA Reveals Workings of Nearby Planetary System

UF-led team uses new observatory to characterize low-mass planets orbiting nearby star

At smallest scale, liquid crystal behavior portends new materials

Electronic nose out in front

Squid and zebrafish cells inspire camouflaging smart materials

Apple iPad outmuscles Android in global tablet sales

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement