Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




EARLY EARTH
Mass extinction may not cause all organisms to 'shrink'
by Staff Writers
London, UK (SPX) Feb 12, 2014


The authors suggest that the lack of size change in the majority of bryozoans studied here may indicate that the Lilliput effect is not universal at all levels, and that the response may vary across organisms.

The sizes of organisms following mass extinction events may vary more than previously thought, which may be inconsistent with the predictions of the so-called 'Lilliput effect,' according to a study published in PLOS ONE on February 5, 2014 by Caroline Sogot from University of Cambridge and colleagues.

Scientists associate mass extinction events like the Cretaceous-Paleogene (abbreviated K-Pg) event with a reduction in organism size in the aftermath, a phenomenon termed 'the Lilliput effect.'

These pronounced changes are thought to be in response to lower food availability and other alterations in the environment that can occur following a mass extinction event.

Therefore, survivors of the K-Pg mass extinction should exhibit smaller body size than their pre-extinction relatives. To delve more into this effect, scientists investigated the changes in size of an aquatic invertebrate at the individual- and colony-level before and after the mass extinction.

Scientists analyzed of the 59 bryozoan species and found no significant change in body length. Additionally, the sizes of two types of bryozoan colonies, 210 Maastrichtian colonies and 163 Danian colonies, did not show consistent size decrease before and after the K-Pg extinction event, although maximum colony size did decline in three out of four surviving types of bryozoan.

The authors suggest that the lack of size change in the majority of bryozoans studied here may indicate that the Lilliput effect is not universal at all levels, and that the response may vary across organisms.

Dr. Sogot added, "The absence of a clear 'Lilliput effect' in the bryozoans analysed in this study suggests that not all organisms respond in the same manner to all mass extinction events."

Sogot CE, Harper EM, Taylor PD (2014) The Lilliput Effect in Colonial Organisms: Cheilostome Bryozoans at the Cretaceous-Paleogene Mass Extinction. PLoS ONE 9(2): e87048. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087048

.


Related Links
PLOS
Explore The Early Earth at TerraDaily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





EARLY EARTH
Mass extinction happened fast: study
Washington (AFP) Feb 10, 2014
Something wiped out nearly all life on Earth more than 250 million years ago, and whatever unleashed this mass die-off acted much faster than previously thought, scientists said Monday. Based on an analysis of rocks in China, the end-Permian extinction occurred over the course of 60,000 years, give or take 48,000, researchers reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. ... read more


EARLY EARTH
Source of 'Moon Curse' Revealed by Eclipse

NASA bets on private companies to exploit moon's resources

Astrobotic Begins Testing at Masten Space Systems

NASA Extends Moon Exploring Satellite Mission

EARLY EARTH
NASA solves mystery of Mars 'doughnut' rock

'Pinnacle Island' Rock Studies Continue

Calculated Risks: How Radiation Rules Mars Exploration

ASU Mars camera to get new views of Red Planet

EARLY EARTH
Hollande on Silicon Valley charm offensive

ORBITEC Supports NASA Kennedys Advanced Plant Habitat for ISS

Tech products can turn uncool when they become too popular

Is it time to lift alcohol ban in space?

EARLY EARTH
China's Jade Rabbit rover comes 'back to life'

Yutu Awakes

Moon plays trick on Jade Rabbit

Waiting for Yutu

EARLY EARTH
Andrews Space Cargo Module Power Unit Provides Power For Payloads Bound For ISS

Russian Progress M-22M docks with ISS following fast rendezvous

Russian Resupply Spacecraft Begins Expedited Flight to Station

NASA Selects Physical Science Research Proposals for the ISS

EARLY EARTH
Airbus Defence and Space wins new ESA contract for Ariane 6

Turkey launches satellite to increase Internet speed

Russia-Kazakhstan Working Group to Report on Proton Launches

Russian Telecoms Satellites Readied for March Launch

EARLY EARTH
Kepler Finds a Very Wobbly Planet

One planet, two stars: new research shows how circumbinary planets form

First Weather Map of Brown Dwarf

NASA-Sponsored 'Disk Detective' Lets Public Search for New Planetary Nurseries

EARLY EARTH
Space junk endangers mankind's usual course of life

Scientists use 'voting' and 'penalties' to overcome quantum errors

Theorists predict new forms of exotic insulating materials

From Stone Age to Space Age: bone pigment helps probe




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement