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Maps fiasco mars Apple's big iPhone launch
by Staff Writers
Washington (AFP) Sept 21, 2012

Samsung plans to add iPhone 5 to patent war
Seoul (AFP) Sept 21, 2012 - South Korea's Samsung Electronics said Friday it was considering adding Apple's new iPhone 5 to a patent infringement case as part of a long-running global legal battle between the rival smartphone giants.

Samsung officials said the company would look into amending its side of an ongoing patent lawsuit in a US court to include the latest Apple gadget, which went on sale across Asia Friday and is due to hit US stores later in the day.

"Our company considers adding Apple's iPhone 5 to the (patent infringement) case... but we cannot say when," a Samsung spokesman told AFP.

"Our decision will be made after our company has analysed the iPhone 5 to see what aspects of its device constitutes patent infringement."

South Korea's Yonhap news agency quoted market watchers as saying Samsung may use its long-term evolution (LTE) patent portfolio to attack the iPhone 5 -- the first Apple phone to use the fourth-generation telecom network.

Samsung and Apple -- respectively the world's number one and two smartphone makers -- have been at loggerheads over dozens of patent lawsuits in 10 nations, accusing each other of copying technologies and designs.

Last month, a California court ordered Samsung to pay $1.05 billion for patent infringement. The South Korean firm has appealed the decision.

Samsung, in a statement late Thursday, accused Apple of continuing to take "aggressive legal measures that will limit market competition".

It added: "Under these circumstances, we have little choice but to take the steps necessary to protect our innovations and intellectual property rights."

Apple maps disaster may solve China-Japan islands row
Tokyo (AFP) Sept 22, 2012 - Apple's new iPhone 5 may have been criticised for its glitch-ridden new maps program, but it may have inadvertently provided a diplomatic solution to China and Japan's ongoing row over disputed islands.

The new smartphone, which has dumped Google Maps in favour of its own version, has been ridiculed for misplacing major landmarks, shifting towns and even creating a new airport.

But amid a row over an outcrop of islands claimed by both Tokyo and Beijing, Apple's new iO6 software has provided a resolution of sorts.

When a user searches for the Tokyo-controlled Senkaku islands in the East China Sea, claimed by Beijing under the name Diaoyu, two sets of the islands appear alongside each other.

"The map has one set of islands for each country. Is this a message from Apple that we civilians must not get engaged in a pointless dispute?" one Japanese blogger wrote.

The new mapping program was released this week as part of Apple's updated mobile operating system software, which powers the new iPhone 5, released Friday, and can be installed as an upgrade on other Apple devices.

To the chagrin of many, the new operating system replaces Google Maps, which had been the default mapping system in Apple devices until now.

As of yet there is no stand-alone Google Maps app available for the iPhone, although some reports say this is coming.

The East China Sea islands, strategically coveted outcrops, have been the focus of a territorial dispute between Tokyo and Beijing, with tensions escalating dramatically after the Japanese government bought three of them from their private owners.

Tens of thousands of anti-Japanese demonstrators rallied across China, with some vandalising Japanese shops and factories, forcing firms to shut or scale back production.

Melting bridges, misplaced landmarks, and major cities disappearing: Apple's glitch-ridden maps program released in its new mobile software has customers fuming and analysts puzzled.

"Although #ios6 may say differently, we can assure you that the Tacoma Narrows Bridges have not melted," the Washington State transportation Department tweeted along with a picture of its hugely distorted spans on Apple Maps.

The new map program was released this week as part of Apple's iOS 6 mobile operating software, which powers its new iPhone 5 released Friday and can be installed as an upgrade on other Apple devices.

To the chagrin of many, the new operating system boots out Google Maps, which had been the default mapping system in Apple devices until now. And there is no Google Maps app yet for iPhone, although some reports say this is coming.

"Apple's made a new product that actually is pretty but dumb. Worse, they've used their platform dominance to privilege their own app over a competitor's offering, even though it's a worse experience for users," said Anil Dash, co-founder of the New York tech consultancy Activate.

Dash said that in trying Apple Maps, he was unable to locate the Bloomberg Tower in New York, and when he tried to find an address on Lexington Avenue in Manhattan, the program took him to Brooklyn.

"I'd tried the driving maps for everywhere from the New Jersey suburbs to rural Mexico and found out-of-date road information, impossible directions and a general level of unreliability that I never recall seeing from Google Maps, even when it first launched," Dash said on his blog.

Many of the map miscues were highlighted on social media sites, including a Tumblr page titled "Those Amazing iOS 6 Maps."

"Palace of Justice in Vienna is labeled Palace of Justice Nurnberg (which is in Germany, over 500km away)," one contributor wrote in a caption for an Apple Maps image.

"Sweden's second largest city, Gothenburg seems to have vanished," another caption read.

The maps disaster marred the image of a company which seemed to have the Midas touch for hugely successful new products like the iPhone and iPad.

"Apple is taking a painful public beating right now on its new mapping app," said Greg Sterling, a consultant with Sterling Market Intelligence, on the Search Engine Land blog, adding that it might cause some people to hold off upgrading their software or buying the new iPhone.

"It's curious that the product is so glitch-ridden. One would have assumed that the company had some indication of these problems from developers who've had the new OS for several months."

Sterling said Apple should have been able to avoid the problem "if it had positioned Maps as a beta product and solicited crowd-sourced feedback accordingly. In the absence of such messaging, everyone had inflated expectations."

The uproar prompted Finnish rival Nokia, which has a long history of mapping with its Navteq unit, to boast about its own program.

"We truly understand that maps and location-based apps must be accurate, provide the best quality and be accessible basically anywhere," Nokia's Pino Bonetti wrote on a company blog.

"That's been standard practice at Nokia for the past six years, and we also understand that 'pretty' isn't enough. You expect excellence in your smartphone mapping experience."

Some blogs advised users to work around the problems by accessing Google Maps on the iPhone's mobile browser.

Apple meantime urged patience, saying the problems will be fixed.

"We launched this new map service knowing that it is a major initiative and we are just getting started with it," Apple spokeswoman Trudy Muller said in an email.

"We are continuously improving it, and as Maps is a cloud-based solution, the more people use it, the better it will get. We're also working with developers to integrate some of the amazing transit apps in the App Store into iOS Maps. We appreciate all of the customer feedback and are working hard to make the customer experience even better."

Although the maps application does not generate revenues directly, it often links to searches, and keep users in the company's "ecosystem," which can be important over the long term.

Zaid Al-Timimi, an independent app developer in Washington, said Apple and Google have vastly different approaches for their map programs.

"Apple's strategy for transit and for local events is to allow local app vendors to plug in to Apple Maps," he told AFP. "The Google approach of course is to provide all of the data itself so it can sell advertisements. So these are two different philosophies."

Key dates in Apple history
San Francisco (AFP) Sept 21, 2012 - The following are key dates in the history of Apple, which released its eagerly awaited iPhone 5 on Friday.

1976: Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak unveil the first Apple computer in Palo Alto, California. It consists of little more than a circuit board and costs just under $700.

1977: The Apple II with a one-megahertz processor becomes the first mass-produced computer and an instant hit.

1980: Apple becomes a publicly traded company.

1983: Lisa, the first personal computer featuring a mouse for navigating and desktop icons and folders, is introduced. Its failure is blamed on a daunting price of nearly $10,000.

1984: The Macintosh personal computer makes its debut. It is affordable and features innovations such as a disk drive and built-in monitor, along with a mouse.

1997: Jobs returns as head of Apple, more than a decade after being stripped of control in an internal power struggle. Arch-rival Microsoft invests $150 million in the company.

1998: Jobs revamps Apple's product line, churning out colourful $1,300 iMac PCs with monitors and drives in the same casing.

1999: The iBook, marketed as a mobile iMac, is introduced.

2001: Apple launches the iPod pocket digital music player for $399 and opens its first retail store in Palo Alto.

2003: Apple opens online music store iTunes.

2007: Apple kicks off the era of the touchscreen smartphone with the new iPhone.

2010: Apple unveils the iPad tablet computer, a huge hit after it goes on sale in April. Apple passes Microsoft in May as the largest US technology company in terms of market value.


-- August 24: Jobs announces his resignation as CEO for health reasons and is replaced by chief operating officer Tim Cook, but stays on as Apple board chairman.

-- October 4: Apple unveils the iPhone 4s, which includes a built-in "personal assistant" but fails to dazzle investors as it is not the next-generation iPhone 5 smartphone many had hoped for.

-- October 5: Apple announces the death of Jobs at the age of 56.


-- September 12: Apple introduces its new iPhone 5, a lighter, thinner and more powerful version of its mobile device.

-- September 21: The iPhone 5 is released around the world. Apple says that it received more than two million orders for the phone in the 24 hours after it began pre-sales online on September 14.


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iPhone 5 rollout draws big crowds worldwide
New York (AFP) Sept 21, 2012
Apple fans queued in Asia, Europe and North America on Friday for the new iPhone 5, which appeared set to break sales records despite lukewarm reviews and complaints about its mapping system. The crowds of eager buyers looked set to make the latest iPhone a huge commercial success for the trend-setting US tech giant. Some analysts say Apple may sell 10 million in just the first days of the l ... read more

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