Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




TECH SPACE
Japan cuts radiation exposure limits for children
by Staff Writers
Tokyo (AFP) Aug 26, 2011


Japan on Friday lowered radiation exposure limits for children to below one millisievert per year while at school due to health concerns in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear crisis.

The education ministry delivered the instruction to all schools across the nation including Fukushima where high levels of radiation were released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant crippled by the March 11 quake and tsunami.

Following the accident, Japan raised the exposure limit for both adults and children from one to 20 millisieverts per year, matching the maximum exposure level for nuclear industry workers in many countries.

The move prompted outrage and parents in Fukushima had been calling on the government to lower limits at school, claiming that children face a higher risk from radiation-linked cancers and other diseases than adults.

Radiation experts agree that children are at greatest risk from cancers and genetic defects because they are still growing, are more prone to thyroid cancers, and because they will have more time to develop health defects.

The education ministry has said children's radiation exposure at schools in Fukushima is currently estimated at 0.534 millisievert per year.

Shortly after the accident, most schools banned children from playing football or baseball on outdoor fields or splashing around in swimming pools exposed to the sky in Fukushima amid radiation fears.

Separately, Japan also set a long-term target to reduce the radiation exposure level to one millisievert per year or below for all people in contaminated areas.

Prime Minister Naoto Kan, who announced his resignation Friday, said the government will "make utmost efforts to make the areas safe for children to live as before," Jiji Press quoted.

The move came as residents of areas within three kilometres (1.8 miles) of the Fukushima plant temporarily returned home for the first time since the areas were designated as no-go zone following the accident.

Wearing protective suit, some 150 residents from Futaba and Okuma towns returned home by bus for about two hours to pick up valuables and other goods, officials said.

.


Related Links
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Melanin's 'trick' for maintaining radioprotection studied
Savannah River SC (SPX) Aug 25, 2011
Sunbathers have long known that melanin in their skin cells provides protection from the damage caused by visible and ultraviolet light. More recent studies have shown that melanin, which is produced by multitudes of the planet's life forms, also gives some species protection from ionizing radiation. In certain microbes, in particular some organisms from near the former nuclear reactor fac ... read more


TECH SPACE
NASA's Next Generation Robotic Lander Gets Sideways During Test

Moon Express Gets Thumbs-Up from NASA for Developing New Lunar Landing Technology

NASA Moon Mission in Final Preparations for September Launch

Neil Armstrong urges return to the Moon

TECH SPACE
Russian, European space agencies to team up for Mars mission

New Rover Snapshots Capture Endeavour Crater Vistas

France, Russia talk of Mars mission

Possibility of Mars microbial life eyed

TECH SPACE
New Report Analyzes Development Paths of Emerging Space Nations and Sustainable Use of Outer Space

First Soyuz launch from Kourou to go ahead: Arianespace

Recent grad's astro feats regarded as research crown 'joule'

Draper Spacesuit Could Keep NASA Astronauts Stable, Healthier in Space

TECH SPACE
Orbits for Tiangong

Chinese orbiter launch failure will not affect unmanned space module launch

Rocket malfunction causes satellite to not reach preset orbit

China satellite aborts mission after 'malfunction'

TECH SPACE
Thales Alenia Space's Cygnus PCM shipped to United States

Resupply Craft Lost While Crew Focuses on Departure and Science

Russia may delay manned space launch after crash

ISS crew safe despite supply failure: Russia, US

TECH SPACE
The fifth Ariane 5 of 2011 is ready for integration of its dual-satellite payload

Glonass-M satellite launch postponed for additional check

Russia 'grounds Soyuz rockets' after space crash

Russian spaceship crashes back to Earth

TECH SPACE
A Planet Made of Diamond

Astronomers Find Ice and Possibly Methane on Snow White

Hubble to Target 'Hot Jupiters'

Stellar eclipse gives glimpse of exoplanet

TECH SPACE
Steve Jobs a product wizard: Wozniak

Japan cuts radiation exposure limits for children

Mexican Government Gains Satellite Management Efficiency from Optimal Satcom Integrated Software System

Fukushima caesium leaks 'equal 168 Hiroshimas'




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement