Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




SHAKE AND BLOW
Hurricane, tropical storm combine to kill 19 in Mexico
by Staff Writers
Acapulco, Mexico (AFP) Sept 15, 2013


Typhoon Man-yi hits Japan
Tokyo (AFP) Sept 15, 2013 - Typhoon Man-yi hit southern Japan Monday, bringing heavy rains as officials warned of floods and strong winds, amid fears the storm could go on to hit the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant.

About 200 domestic flights scheduled for Monday, a public holiday, were cancelled, mainly those departing Tokyo, and train services were also reduced.

The storm, located in Pacific waters close to the southern island of Shikoku, was packing gusts up to 144 kilometres (90 miles) per hour overnight Sunday to Monday and moving north-northwest, the Japan Meteorological Agency said.

It was on a direct course to hit southern parts of the main island Honshu Monday morning, possibly around 9:00 am (0000 GMT) in Shizuoka prefecture, southwest of Tokyo, according to the agency.

The typhoon was then expected to head northeast towards the capital and its surrounding region by around noon and cross the northeast including the Fukushima area, according to its predicted track.

At Fukushima, crews have struggled to contain the nuclear plant after the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami that led to the contamination of groundwater with radioactive materials as it flows to the Pacific Ocean.

With torrential rains expected Monday more contaminated water was feared to seep into the groundwater and workers pumped water from around highly radioactive tanks at the plant.

The typhoon already brought heavy rain and strong winds in the south and east before even hitting Japan but no major damage was reported.

The weather agency issued warnings for flooding, heavy rain, mudslides and high ocean waves to areas along the Pacific coast.

Hurricane Ingrid and Tropical Storm Manuel triggered rain, landslides and floods on Mexico's east and west coasts Sunday, killing at least 19 people and forcing thousands to evacuate before landfall.

Manuel made landfall on the Pacific side while Ingrid was expected to reach the coast on the Gulf of Mexico on Monday, but they had already swollen rivers, flooded streets and damaged bridges.

State-run energy firm Pemex evacuated three oil platforms off the Gulf coast of the northeastern state of Tamaulipas and shut down 24 wells, the company said on its Twitter account.

On the Pacific coast, Manuel was weakening after making landfall near the Colima state town of Manzanillo, packing top winds of almost 50 miles (85 kilometers) per hour as it moved northwest, the US hurricane center said in a 2100 GMT advisory.

Before hitting land, the storm was blamed for at least 14 deaths in the neighboring state of Guerrero, where more than 2,000 people abandoned their homes, officials said.

Of the 14 fatalities, six people were killed on Saturday when their van's driver lost control due to a lack of visibility and a slippery road on their way to the resort city of Acapulco, civil protection official Constantino Gonzales Vargas told AFP.

Six others died in landslides and the collapse of walls in three Guerrero towns. Two more people drowned when they were swept away by a swollen river in the state capital Chilpancingo.

Water rose as high as three feet (one meter) in parts of Acapulco, dragging cars away, while the road leading to the international airport's terminal was closed.

The city's port was shut to navigation and a warning was issued against recreational use of beaches ahead of the hurricane's strong winds. Two men who sailed away were reported missing.

Manuel was 15 miles (20 kilometers) north of Manzanillo and was expected to dissipate on Monday, but it was expected to produce life-threatening surf and coastal flooding, the Miami-based hurricane center said.

As Hurricane Ingrid crept toward the east coast, three people, including a 16-year-old boy, were killed in a landslide in Tlatlauquitepec, a mountain town in the central state of Puebla.

In the central state of Hidalgo, a nurse and her driver drowned when their car was swept away by a overflowing river as they headed to a mountain area heavily affected by days of rain, civil protection officials said.

The hurricane had already forced the evacuation of 6,000 people in the east coast state of Veracruz after two rivers overflowed their banks.

At least 20 bridges were damaged during rains in the north of the state that cut off 71 communities, authorities said.

The US National Hurricane Center said at 2100 GMT that Ingrid's outer rain bands were nearing the Gulf coast and that it could slightly strengthen early Monday before reaching the coast.

The storm's center was 110 miles (175 kilometers) east of Tampico, with maximum sustained winds of 75 miles (120 kilometers) per hour.

The forecasters also said Ingrid was expected to trigger a storm surge of as much as five feet (1.5 meters), with "large and destructive waves."

.


Related Links
Bringing Order To A World Of Disasters
When the Earth Quakes
A world of storm and tempest






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





SHAKE AND BLOW
Two tropical storms flank Mexico's coasts
Mexico City (AFP) Sept 14, 2013
Two tropical storms flanked Mexico on the Gulf and Pacific coasts on Friday, producing heavy rains, causing rivers to overflow and threatening to spark landslides, forecasters said. Tropical Storm Manuel formed off the western coast hours after Ingrid emerged in the Gulf of Mexico near the eastern state of Veracruz., according to US and Mexican weather authorities. Tropical Storm Ingrid ... read more


SHAKE AND BLOW
Sixteen Tons of Moondust

Scientists say water on moon may have originated on Earth

Moon landing mission to use "secret weapons"

NASA launches spacecraft to study Moon atmosphere

SHAKE AND BLOW
Explosive flooding said responsible for distinctive Mars terrain

Upgrade to Mars rovers could aid discovery on more distant worlds

Investigating 'Coal Island' Rock Outcrop

Terramechanics research aims to keep Mars rovers rolling

SHAKE AND BLOW
NASA Spacecraft Embarks on Historic Journey Into Interstellar Space

Elite Group of Young Scientists Embark on DARPA Research Efforts

From Elvis to E.T.? The Voyagers' extraordinary tale

Astronauts prepare for deep space -- by going deep underground

SHAKE AND BLOW
China civilian technology satellites put into use

China to launch lunar lander by end of year: media

China launches three experimental satellites

Medical quarantine over for Shenzhou-10 astronauts

SHAKE AND BLOW
ISS Releases a White Stork and Awaits a Swan

Three astronauts back on Earth from ISS: mission control

ISS Crew Completes Spacewalk Preps

Russian cosmonaut set for space station mission resigns

SHAKE AND BLOW
Arianespace remains the global launch services leader

Russian space official denies report of problem in Soyuz return

Lockheed Martin Atlas V To Launch Morelos-3 ComSat

Japan sets new date for satellite rocket launch

SHAKE AND BLOW
ESA selects SSTL to design Exoplanet satellite mission

Coldest Brown Dwarfs Blur Lines between Stars and Planets

NASA-funded Program Helps Amateur Astronomers Detect Alien Worlds

Observations strongly suggest distant super-Earth has water atmosphere

SHAKE AND BLOW
Butterfly wings inspire new technologies: from fabrics and cosmetics to sensors

Calculating the carbon footprint of California's products

First laser-like X-ray light from a solid

Space's 'Ferrari' set to fall to Earth




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement