Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




CLIMATE SCIENCE
Global warming: Heat stress hits labour productivity
by Staff Writers
Paris (AFP) Feb 24, 2013


Heat stress from global warming may be having an impact on outdoor work productivity in hot regions like northern Australia, Southeast Asia and the southern United States, a study said Sunday.

In recent decades, rising temperatures and higher humidity reduced labour capacity, on paper at least, by 10 percent during the hottest months, it says.

And by 2050, labour capacity -- the ability to maintain efficiency in outdoor work -- could fall by 20 percent, it warns.

Farmworkers, construction labourers and the military are among the sectors most exposed to hotter, steamier conditions.

The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, uses a computer model that simulates warming and a rise in humidity and their impact on strenuous outdoor activity.

The most vulnerable regions are the Arabian peninsula, the Indian sub-continent, Southeast Asia, northern Australia and the greater Caribbean region, including the lower Mississippi Valley, according to John Dunne of the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory.

The model assumes an increase in temperature of 0.8 degrees Celsius (1.44 degrees Fahrenheit) and a rise of five percent in absolute humidity for 2010, compared with a benchmark, which comprises the average over a century to 1960.

It foresees warming of 1.4-1.7 C (2.5-3.0 F) and a humidity rise of 11 percent by 2050 compared to this benchmark.

For calculation purposes, it also assumes that in temperate regions, people work continuously, but in the hottest places, the working day is split between 80 percent work and 20 percent rest.

The authors point out that the models do not take into account several factors that could change the picture, such as technological change and fluctuations in carbon emissions.

.


Related Links
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CLIMATE SCIENCE
As predators decline, carbon emissions rise
Vancouver, Canada (SPX) Feb 22, 2013
University of British Columbia researchers have found that when the animals at the top of the food chain are removed, freshwater ecosystems emit a lot more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. "Predators are disappearing from our ecosystems at alarming rates because of hunting and fishing pressure and because of human induced changes to their habitats," says Trisha Atwood, a PhD candidate i ... read more


CLIMATE SCIENCE
Water On The Moon: It's Been There All Along

Building a lunar base with 3D printing

US, Europe team up for moon fly-by

Russia to Launch Lunar Mission in 2015

CLIMATE SCIENCE
NASA Rover Confirms First Drilled Mars Rock Sample

India plans mission to Mars in 2013

Rover finds gray rock beneath Red Planet's surface

Bleach could hamper Mars life search

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Supersonic skydiver's records confirmed

Kennedy Engineers Designing Plant Habitat For ISS

NASA plant study headed to space station

NASA Spinoff 2012 Features New Space Tech Bettering Your Life Today

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Welcome Aboard Shenzhou 10

Reshuffle for Tiangong

China to launch 20 spacecrafts in 2013

Mr Xi in Space

CLIMATE SCIENCE
NASA briefly loses contact with space station

Temporary Comm Loss Interrupts Crew's Day

Low-Gravity Flights Will Aid ISS Fluids and Combustion Experiments

Progress docks with ISS

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Countdown begins for Indo-French satellite launch

NASA Seeks University Participants for Summer Rocket Workshop

Another Sea Launch Failure

ILS Concludes Yamal 402 Proton Launch Investigation

CLIMATE SCIENCE
NASA's Kepler Mission Discovers Tiny Planet System

Kepler helps astronomers find tiny exo planet

Searching for a Pale Blue SPHERE in the Universe

Earth-like planets are right next door

CLIMATE SCIENCE
A Semiconductor 'Nano-Shish-Kebabs' With 3-D Potential

That's the way the droplets adhere

Acoustic-assisted magnetic information storage

DARPA Seeks to Defuse the Threat of Ionizing Radiation




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement