Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. 24/7 Space News .




TECH SPACE
ESA deploys first orbital debris test radar in Spain
by Staff Writers
Paris (ESA) Oct 16, 2012


A new radar designed to test methods for finding orbital debris that can be hazardous to space navigation has been installed in Spain. The radar will be used to develop future debris warning services, helping boost safety for European satellite operators. Following an 18-month design and development phase, the radar was installed near Santorcaz, about 30 km from Madrid, with the first series of acceptance and validation tests are scheduled to begin in mid-November 2012. Credits: ESA.

A new radar designed to test methods for finding orbital debris that can be hazardous to space navigation has been installed in Spain. The radar will be used to develop future debris warning services, helping boost safety for European satellite operators. Following an 18-month design and development phase, the radar was installed near Santorcaz, about 30 km from Madrid, and the first series of acceptance and validation tests are scheduled to begin in mid-November.

ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme office and Spain's Indra Espacio S.A. signed a 4.7-million euro contract to build the radar in 2010.

Early debris detection is crucial to help warn satellite operators of collision risks and enable avoidance manoeuvres to be made.

Indra Espacio is the prime industrial partner and is responsible for the design and development of the radar transmitter. The development of the radar receiver was subcontracted to the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR), Wachtberg, Germany.

Significant milestone in ESA's SSA programme
"Installation of the test radar at Santorcaz is a significant milestone in ESA's SSA programme," says Nicolas Bobrinsky, Head of ESA's Space Situational Awareness Preparatory Programme.

"Fielding a so-called 'breadboard' radar means that Spanish and German industry are developing world-class technical expertise in the radar detection of hazardous space debris."

'Breadboard' means that the radar is easily reconfigurable depending on test results, helping engineers optimise its performance over time.

Test radar uses 'monostatic' design to detect debris
The radar deployed in Spain by ESA makes use of the 'monostatic' design, in which the transmitter and receiver are co-located within just a few hundred meters.

A second contract to develop a 'bistatic' design radar, in which the transmitter and receiver are separated by several hundreds of kilometres, was signed with a separate industrial grouping in September 2012.

"This monostatic radar will be used to demonstrate and validate radar technologies for space debris surveillance in low-altitude orbits," says Gian Maria Pinna, Ground Segment Manager in ESA's SSA office.

"Although the capabilities of the test radar are limited, its design will allow us to achieve considerable understanding of the technical problems inherent in orbital debris detection with radar techniques, a know-how that ESA is increasingly building-up via the SSA Programme."

In the future, the two test radars, bistatic and monostatic, will be joined by an initial set of optical telescopes for the surveillance of higher altitude orbits, and the entire system will be incrementally improved to develop precursor warning services for satellite operators.

.


Related Links
Space Situational Awareness
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Boeing Proposes Gas Clouds to Remove Space Debris
Bethesda MD (SPX) Oct 16, 2012
Space debris issues continue to proliferate and concern continues to build. It is not surprising that the big aerospace companies are gearing up to take advantage of any future debris removal contracts. The fact is that space debris is really a "ticking time bomb" that will go off sometime within the next several years. No one knows when a chain reaction of debris/satellite collisions will ... read more


TECH SPACE
University of Tennessee study confirms solar wind as source for moon water

Russia to launch lunar mission in 2015

Moon water could have solar source: study

Solar wind particles likely source of water locked inside lunar soils

TECH SPACE
NMSU Graduate Student Looks For Indications Of Life On Mars In Possible Trace Methane Gas

Rover's Second Scoop Discarded, Third Scoop Commanded

Robotic Arm Tools Get To Work On Rock Outcrop

Curiosity Preparing for Second Scoop

TECH SPACE
Austrian space diver no stranger to danger

Baumgartner feat boosts hopes for imperilled astronauts

Austrian breaks sound barrier in record space jump

Austrian daredevil to make new space jump bid

TECH SPACE
China launches civilian technology satellites

ChangE-2 Mission To Lagrange L2 Point

Meeting of heads of ESA and China Manned Space Agency

China Spacesat gets 18-million-USD gov't support

TECH SPACE
Crew Unloads Dragon, Finds Treats

Station Crew Opens Dragon Hatch

NASA and International Partners Approve Year Long ISS Stay

Year on ISS planned ahead of manned Mars mission

TECH SPACE
AFSPC commander convenes AIB

Proton Lofts Intelsat 23 For Americas, Europe and Africa Markets

India to launch 58 space missions in next 5 years

SpaceX Dragon Successfully Attaches To Space Station

TECH SPACE
Ultra-Compact Planetary System Is A Touchstone For Understanding New Planet Population

Nearest Star Has Earth Mass Planet

Distant planet found circling with 4 stars

Nearby Super-Earth Likely a Diamond Planet

TECH SPACE
ESA deploys first orbital debris test radar in Spain

Boeing Proposes Gas Clouds to Remove Space Debris

Microsoft to price new tablet near same as iPad

UNH scientists provide window on space radiation hazards




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement