Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




WATER WORLD
Dinosaur bends caused by prolonged diving
by Staff Writers
Melbourne, Australia (SPX) Aug 22, 2012


Associate Professor Hayman said the dangerous practice of deep sea diving wouldn't have affected the replites' long-term survival because any ill effects would have developed later in life.

Dinosaurs-like creatures may have injured themselves during leisurely deep-sea diving trips and not from resurfacing too quickly, as previously thought.

A recent study identified bone deformities on the fossilized remains of Ichthyosarians, which were giant dolphin-like reptiles that first appeared about 245 million years ago.

The lesions were similar to those human divers develop as a result of changes in body pressure, and suggest the reptiles suffered from a version of 'the bends'.

A new analysis by University of Melbourne pathologist Associate Professor John Hayman (0400 173 408) - published in the latest edition of the Naturwissenschaften: Science of Nature journal - sought to explain what may have caused the bone lesions.

That research argues the scarring may be the result of deep diving and spending too long at depth, causing excess nitrogen to be dissolved in the body, and not from quick ascents as previously thought.

"Ichthyosarians probably evolved the ability to dive deeper and to remain at depth for longer periods," Professor Hayman said.

"An alternative explanation is that the reptiles developed decompression sickness from being trapped in shallow water by predators.

"It wasn't from sudden and rapid ascents," he said.

Associate Professor Hayman said the dangerous practice of deep sea diving wouldn't have affected the replites' long-term survival because any ill effects would have developed later in life.

"The lesions wouldn't have been enough to kill the animal, and wouldn't have affected it's ability to hunt or breed."

Professor Hayman said the new analysis was possible because structure of modern humans' necks are very similar to the prehistoric reptiles.

"The arterial blood supply to the humerus and other bones such as the neck of the femur is highly conserved. It has remained much the same for 250 million years."

.


Related Links
University of Melbourne
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Rating of ocean health shows 'room for improvement'
Corvallis, OR (SPX) Aug 20, 2012
An international group of more than 30 researchers have given a score to every coastal nation on their contribution to the health of the world's oceans, which showed the United States as being slightly above average, and identified food provision, tourism and recreation as leading concerns. The analysis, published in the journal Nature, scored each nation on a 0-100 scale in 10 separate ca ... read more


WATER WORLD
Chinese firm to send Spanish rover to moon in 2014

LRO Spectrometer Detects Helium in Moon's Atmosphere

NASA's 'Mighty Eagle' Robotic Prototype Lander Flies Again at Marshall

Roscosmos Announces Tender for Moon Rocket Design

WATER WORLD
New Mars mission to take first look at what's going on deep inside the Red Planet

Curiosity rover set for first test drive

Rover's Laser Instrument Zaps First Martian Rock

Fantastic Phobos

WATER WORLD
For US students, plane tickets, TVs are relics

Voyager at 35: Break on Through to the Other Side

XCOR Becomes Corporate Sponsor of Uwingu, a Space Apps Company

Florida Spaceport Stakes Claim to Commercial Missions

WATER WORLD
Is China Going to Blast Past America in Space?

Hong Kong people share joy of China's manned space program

China's Long March-5 carrier rocket engine undergoes testing

China to land first moon probe next year

WATER WORLD
Space station orbit successfully adjusted

ISS Orbit Adjustment to Continue on August 22

Cosmonauts Begin First Expedition 32 Spacewalk

ATV-3 Vehicle Fails to Adjust Space Station Orbit

WATER WORLD
ASTRA 2F touches down in French Guiana for Arianespace's next Ariane 5 dual-passenger mission

Satellite preparations move into full swing for the next Arianespace Soyuz mission from French Guiana

Russian Booster Rocket Lifts US Satellite in Seaborne Launch

India's GSAT-10 satellite continues its checkout for the upcoming Arianespace Ariane 5 mission

WATER WORLD
First Evidence Discovered of Planet's Destruction by Its Star

Exoplanet hosting stars give further insights on planet formation

Five Potential Habitable Exoplanets Now

RIT Leads Development of Next-generation Infrared Detectors

WATER WORLD
Hewlett-Packard books $8.9 bn loss

Apple-Samsung smartphone clash heads to jury

China slightly increases export quota for rare earths

Information overload in the era of 'big data'




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement