Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. 24/7 Space News .




WATER WORLD
Delving into the molecular mechanism behind deep-sea bacteria's pressure tolerance
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Jul 31, 2012


File image.

The Mariana Trench is the deepest feature of the Earth's surface. The water column there exerts a pressure of more than one thousand times normal atmospheric pressure at sea level, enough pressure to crush an SUV. Yet many organisms thrive in this seemingly inhospitable environment. A Japanese research team has been investigating how deep-sea bacteria adapt to such high-pressure conditions.

They have identified a structural change that confers pressure-resistant properties on a particular protein found in bacteria.

The findings, which the team will present at the meeting of the American Crystallographic Association (ACA), held July 28-Aug. 1, in Boston, Mass., may one day help guide the design of enzymes for use in high-pressure chemical industrial processes.

In general, pressure, like that caused by a water column thousands of feet deep, deforms proteins. As the proteins change shape, water can penetrate the protein's interior. Some proteins are better able to resist this incursion of water, but the molecular mechanisms of the pressure resistance aren't yet well understood.

"Our group is focusing on high-pressure protein crystallography, using 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) as a model protein.

The goal is to delve into the principles of the molecular mechanism of the pressure tolerance of proteins by comparing the structures of IPMDHs from organisms that thrive in high-pressure environments and those that are sensitive to high-pressure pressure environments," explains Nobuhisa Watanabe, a professor at the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Nagoya University.

To create the high pressures necessary for their studies, the team uses a diamond anvil cell (DAC), which consists of two opposing diamonds with a gasket compressed between the culets (the small, flat facet at the bottom of the diamonds).

The team's big discovery so far is that the initial water penetration at the molecular surface of the side opposite to the active site of IPMDH is unique.

"At the site of the penetration, there is a difference of amino acid between IPMDHs from bacteria that thrive in high-pressure environments and those that are sensitive to it. Based on this data, we substituted one amino acid at the site of the IPMDH from pressure-sensitive bacteria and checked its activity under pressure," says Watanabe.

"And as we expected, only this one residue-substituted IPMDH, which has 364 amino acids in total, achieved pressure resistance comparable to the bacteria that thrive in high-pressure environments."

This means that it may soon be possible to synthesize designer pressure-resistant proteins. The team plans to continue their high-pressure studies of several other proteins to try to discover the physical principles behind pressure resistance mechanisms that enable bacteria to thrive in high-pressure conditions.

.


Related Links
American Institute of Physics
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Scotland moves to defuse 'prawn war'
Edinburgh, Scotland (UPI) Jul 30, 2012
Scotland has introduced unprecedented fishing restrictions in a move to defuse a "prawn war" between west coast trawlers and their North Sea counterparts. A severe shortage of prawn off Scotland's east coast this year prompted about 50 additional North Sea fishing vessels to head to the country's west coast, where locals feared their presence would deplete the prawn catch well before it ... read more


WATER WORLD
US flags still on the moon, except one: NASA

Another Small Step for Mankind

Russia starts building Moon spaceship, eyes Lunar base

Plans to revisit Moon impeded by financial difficulties

WATER WORLD
New York's Times Square to broadcast Mars landing

ESA's Mars Express supports dramatic landing on Mars

Martian polygons and deep-sea polygons on Earth: More evidence for ancient Martian oceans?

Sending Our Curiosity to Mars

WATER WORLD
Science fiction comes to life in Italian lab

XCOR Releases Payload Users Guide for Lynx Suborbital Vehicle

NASA Offers Condolences on the Passing of Pioneering Astronaut Sally Ride

Sally Ride, first US woman in space dead at 61

WATER WORLD
China to land first moon probe next year

China launches Third satellite in its global data relay network

Looking Forward to Shenzhou 10

Argentina, China ink space cooperation deal

WATER WORLD
A Fish Friendly Facility for the ISS

Russian cargo ship manages to dock at ISS on second try

Another Progress Freighter Re-Docking Attempt Set for July 29

Japanese cargo craft docks with ISS

WATER WORLD
Checkout begins with the Fregat upper stage for Arianespace's third Soyuz mission from French Guiana

ESA studies future of Europe's launch services

The Intelsat 20 integrated on to Ariane 5 for upcoming flight

Arianespace's Ariane 5 receives its HYLAS 2 payload

WATER WORLD
RIT Leads Development of Next-generation Infrared Detectors

UCF Discovers Exoplanet Neighbor

Can Astronomers Detect Exoplanet Oceans

The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing Dust

WATER WORLD
Quantifying the Environmental Impact of Structural Materials with B-PATH

Northrop Grumman GATOR Radar System Delivered to Wallops Island for the Start of Government Developmental Testing

Jury picked in blockbuster Apple-Samsung case

BELLA Laser Achieves World Record Power at One Pulse Per Second




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement