Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. 24/7 Space News .




CLIMATE SCIENCE
Climate vs. weather: Extreme events narrow the doubts
by Staff Writers
Paris (AFP) Aug 22, 2012


Philippines sets up climate change fund
Manila (AFP) Aug 21, 2012 - Philippine President Benigno Aquino has signed a law creating a one billion peso (about $24 million) "survival fund" to combat the effects of climate change, a government official said Tuesday.

The law is meant to fund climate adaptation projects in a country battered by about 20 typhoons a year that cause large-scale deaths and damage, said Climate Change Commission deputy head Mary Anne Lucille Sering.

Philippine officials as well as international experts have said the growing intensity of the annual typhoons are a result of climate change.

"Now, we have the means to make our communities safer against the intensifying effects of climate change," Sering said in a statement.

The law, signed Friday, would use the survival fund to bankroll projects in water resource management and boost forecasting and early warning systems for climate-related hazards, Sering said.

It would also be used to guarantee risk insurance for farmers in case of crop damage, she added.

Heatwaves, drought and floods that have struck the northern hemisphere for the third summer running are narrowing doubts that man-made warming is disrupting Earth's climate system, say some scientists.

Climate experts as a group are reluctant to ascribe a single extreme event or season to global warming.

Weather, they argue, has to be assessed over far longer periods to confirm a shift in the climate and whether natural factors or fossil-fuel emissions are the cause.

But for some, such caution is easing.

A lengthening string of brutal weather events is going hand in hand with record-breaking rises in temperatures and greenhouse-gas levels, an association so stark that it can no longer be dismissed as statistical coincidence, they say.

"We prefer to look at average annual temperatures on a global scale, rather than extreme temperatures," said Jean Jouzel, vice chairman of the UN's Nobel-winning scientists, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Even so, according to computer models, "over the medium and long term, one of the clearest signs of climate change is a rise in the frequency of heatwaves", he said.

"Over the last 50 years, we have seen that as warming progresses, heatwaves are becoming more and more frequent," Jouzel said.

"If we don't do anything, the risk of a heatwave occurring will be 10 times higher by 2100 compared with the start of the century."

The past three months have seen some extraordinary weather in the United States, Europe and East and Southeast Asia.

The worst drought in more than 50 years hit the US Midwest breadbasket while forest fires stoked by fierce heat and dry undergrowth erupted in California, France, Greece, Italy, Croatia and Spain.

Heavy rains flooded Manila and Beijing and China's eastern coast was hit by an unprecedented three typhoons in a week.

Last month was the warmest ever recorded for land in the northern hemisphere and a record high for the contiguous United States, according to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Globally, the temperature in July was the fourth highest since records began in 1880, it said.

James Hansen, arguably the world's most famous climate scientist (and a bogeyman to climate skeptics), contends the link between extreme heat events and global warming is now all but irrefutable.

The evidence, he says, comes not from computer simulations but from weather observations themselves.

In a study published this month in the peer-reviewed US journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Hansen and colleagues compared temperatures over the past three decades to a baseline of 1951-80, a period of relative stability.

Over the last 30 years, there was 0.5-0.6 C (0.9-1.0 F) of warming, a rise that seems small but "is already having important effects", said Hansen, director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

During the baseline period, cold summers occurred about a third of the time, but this fell to about 10 percent in the 30-year period that followed.

Hot summers which during the baseline period occurred 33 percent of the time, rose to about 75 percent in the three decades that followed.

Even more remarkable, though, was the geographical expansion of heatwaves.

During the baseline period, an unusually hot summer would yield a heatwave that would cover just a few tenths of one percent of the world's land area.

Today, though, an above-the-norm summer causes heatwaves that in total affect about 10 percent of the land surface.

"The extreme summer climate anomalies in Texas in 2011, in Moscow in 2010 and in France in 2003 almost certainly would not have occurred in the absence of global warming with its resulting shift of the anomaly situation," says the paper.

In March, an IPCC special report said there was mounting evidence of a shift in patterns of extreme events in some regions, including more intense and longer droughts and rainfall. But it saw no increases in the frequency, length or severity of tropical storms.

.


Related Links
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CLIMATE SCIENCE
Experiment would test cloud geoengineering as way to slow warming
Seattle WA (SPX) Aug 21, 2012
Even though it sounds like science fiction, researchers are taking a second look at a controversial idea that uses futuristic ships to shoot salt water high into the sky over the oceans, creating clouds that reflect sunlight and thus counter global warming. University of Washington atmospheric physicist Rob Wood describes a possible way to run an experiment to test the concept on a small s ... read more


CLIMATE SCIENCE
Chinese firm to send Spanish rover to moon in 2014

LRO Spectrometer Detects Helium in Moon's Atmosphere

NASA's 'Mighty Eagle' Robotic Prototype Lander Flies Again at Marshall

Roscosmos Announces Tender for Moon Rocket Design

CLIMATE SCIENCE
New Mars mission to take first look at what's going on deep inside the Red Planet

Curiosity rover set for first test drive

Rover's Laser Instrument Zaps First Martian Rock

Fantastic Phobos

CLIMATE SCIENCE
For US students, plane tickets, TVs are relics

Voyager at 35: Break on Through to the Other Side

XCOR Becomes Corporate Sponsor of Uwingu, a Space Apps Company

Florida Spaceport Stakes Claim to Commercial Missions

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Is China Going to Blast Past America in Space?

Hong Kong people share joy of China's manned space program

China's Long March-5 carrier rocket engine undergoes testing

China to land first moon probe next year

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Space station orbit successfully adjusted

ISS Orbit Adjustment to Continue on August 22

Cosmonauts Begin First Expedition 32 Spacewalk

ATV-3 Vehicle Fails to Adjust Space Station Orbit

CLIMATE SCIENCE
ASTRA 2F touches down in French Guiana for Arianespace's next Ariane 5 dual-passenger mission

Satellite preparations move into full swing for the next Arianespace Soyuz mission from French Guiana

Russian Booster Rocket Lifts US Satellite in Seaborne Launch

India's GSAT-10 satellite continues its checkout for the upcoming Arianespace Ariane 5 mission

CLIMATE SCIENCE
First Evidence Discovered of Planet's Destruction by Its Star

Exoplanet hosting stars give further insights on planet formation

Five Potential Habitable Exoplanets Now

RIT Leads Development of Next-generation Infrared Detectors

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Hewlett-Packard books $8.9 bn loss

Apple-Samsung smartphone clash heads to jury

China slightly increases export quota for rare earths

Information overload in the era of 'big data'




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement