Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




CLIMATE SCIENCE
Climate changes the distribution of plants and animals
by Staff Writers
Basel, Switzerland (SPX) Jan 13, 2014


Plants are moving uphill due to rising temperatures. In figure: Leopard's bane (Doronicum clusii). Illustration courtesy Jorg Schmill

Swiss plants, butterflies and birds have moved 8 to 42 meters uphill between 2003 and 2010, as scientists from the University of Basel write in the online journal "Plos One".

Climate warming is changing the distribution of plants and animals worldwide. Recently it was shown that in the past two decades, European bird and butterfly communities have moved on average 37 and 114 kilometers to the north, respectively.

Tobias Roth and Valentin Amrhein from the University of Basel now found that in Switzerland, plant, butterfly and bird species also moved uphill. At an altitude of 500 meters, plants have on average shifted uphill 8 meters, butterflies 38 meters and birds 42 meters. The study was based on data collected between 2003 and 2010 in 214 sample areas up to an altitude of 3000 meters, covering all major ecosystems of Central Europe.

"An average of eight meters difference in altitude in eight years and across all plant species is quite impressive for the often not very mobile plant communities", says Valentin Amrhein. "The results show that the biological impacts of climate change will not only become apparent in the long term. Animals and plants are already today adapting to the rising temperatures at a surprising pace."

Different Trends above the Tree Line
While birds also moved uphill at higher altitudes, plants and butterflies surprisingly showed no significant changes in altitude above the tree line. Contrary to the developments in lower altitudes, alpine plants and butterflies even showed a tendency towards a downhill movement.

Explanations for this phenomenon have yet to be found. "It is possible that land-use related changes in habitats near the tree line outweigh the effects of climate warming. For example, many alpine pastures have been abandoned in recent years", says Tobias Roth. "It is also possible that alpine plants are better protected against changing climatic conditions, due to the highly varied surface of alpine landscapes."

In any case, the fact that plant and butterfly communities have changed towards warm-dwelling species at low altitudes but remained relatively stable at higher altitudes cannot be explained with different temperature developments across altitudes.

The scientists also studied data on air temperature of 14 meteorological stations: During the 16 years between 1995 and 2010, the summer temperatures in Switzerland rose by about 0.07 C per year at all altitudes.

Tobias Roth, Matthias Plattner and Valentin Amrhein; Plants, birds and butterflies: short-term responses of species communities to climate warming vary by taxon and with altitude Plos One, published January 8th, 2014 | doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0082490

.


Related Links
University of Basel
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CLIMATE SCIENCE
Europe squabbling over greenhouse gas targets
Brussels (AFP) Jan 10, 2014
European nations stand sharply divided over setting new 2030 targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions blamed for global warming, EU sources said Friday. European Commission head Jose Manuel Barroso called in commissioners to try to agree figures ahead of talks on January 22 but there was no progress, one source said. Parliament's environmental and energy committees on Thursday called f ... read more


CLIMATE SCIENCE
Wake Up Yutu

Chang'e-3 satellite payload APXS obtained its first spectrum of lunar regolith

Chang'e 3 Lander and Rover From Above

China's moon rover "sleeps" through lunar night

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Who Wants to Go to Mars - One Way?

More than 1,000 chosen for one-way Mars reality-TV mission

One-way trip to Mars? Sign me up, says Frenchwoman

Clues from Orbit Aiding Exploration Of Opportunity Rover

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Technology aims for perfect jump shot, golf swing

Toymakers target 'kidults' at high-tech Hong Kong fair

China has world's most outbound tourists

An astronaut's rhythm

CLIMATE SCIENCE
China launches communications satellite for Bolivia

China's moon rover continues lunar survey after photographing lander

China's Yutu "naps", awakens and explores

Deep space monitoring station abroad imperative

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Obama Administration Extends ISS Until at Least 2024

NASA extends space station life to 2024

New Science Bound for Station on Orbital's Cygnus

CU-Boulder to fly antibiotic experiment on ants to space station

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Orbital Sciences launches second mission to space station

Cygnus Heads to Space for First Station Resupply Mission

Orbital to attempt launch to space station Thursday

'20 years of toil has paid off' Says Radhkrishnan

CLIMATE SCIENCE
NASA's Kepler Provides Insights on Enigmatic Planets

Powerful Planet Finder Turns Its Eye to the Sky

New kind of planet or failed star? Astrophysicists discover category-defying celestial object

SF State astronomers discover new planet in Pisces constellation

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Towards perfect control of light waves

GPM Completes Spacecraft Alignments

S. Asia takes 71 percent of market for ship breaking

3D printing poised to shake up shopping




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement