Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. 24/7 Space News .




CARBON WORLDS
Climate change: How does soil store CO2?
by Staff Writers
Munich, Germany (SPX) Jan 17, 2014


Carbon tends to bind to specific rough mineral surfaces in the soil (yellow areas). (Image courtesy C. Vogel/TUM)

Global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions continue to rise - in 2012 alone, 35.7 billion tons of this greenhouse gas entered the atmosphere*. Some of this CO2 is absorbed by the oceans, plants and soil.

As such, they provide a significant reservoir of carbon, stemming the release of CO2. Scientists have now discovered how organic carbon is stored in soil. Basically, the carbon only binds to certain soil structures. This means that soil's capacity to absorb CO2 needs to be re-assessed and incorporated into today's climate models.

Previous studies have established that carbon binds to tiny mineral particles. In this latest study, published in Nature Communications, researchers of the Technische Universitat Munchen (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen have shown that the surface of the minerals plays just as important a role as their size.

"The carbon binds to minerals that are just a few thousandths of a millimeter in size - and it accumulates there almost exclusively on rough and angular surfaces," explains Prof. Ingrid Kogel-Knabner, TUM Chair of Soil Science.

The role of microorganisms in sequestering carbon
It is presumed that the rough mineral surfaces provide an attractive habitat for microbes. These convert the carbon and play a part in binding it to minerals. "We discovered veritable hot spots with a high proportion of carbon in the soil," relates Cordula Vogel, the lead author of the study. "Furthermore, new carbon binds to areas which already have a high carbon content."

These carbon hot spots are, however, only found on around 20 percent of the mineral surfaces. It was previously assumed that carbon is evenly distributed in the soil. "Thanks to our study, we can now pin-point the soil that is especially good for sequestering CO2," continues Kogel-Knabner. "The next step is to include these findings in carbon cycle models."

Mass spectrometer helps to visualize molecules
The sample material used by the team was loess, a fertile agricultural soil found in all parts of the world - which makes it a very important carbon store. The researchers were able to take ultra-precise measurements using the NanoSIMS mass spectrometer. This procedure allowed them to view and compare even the most minute soil structures.

Submicron structures provide preferential spots for carbon and nitrogen sequestration in soils, Cordula Vogel, Carsten W. Muller, Carmen Hoschen, Franz Buegger, Katja Heister, Stefanie Schulz, Michael Schloter and Ingrid Kogel-Knabner, Nature Communications, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3947.

.


Related Links
Technische Universitat Munchen
Carbon Worlds - where graphite, diamond, amorphous, fullerenes meet






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CARBON WORLDS
Fungi may determine the future of soil carbon
Panama City, Panama (SPX) Jan 16, 2014
When scientists discuss global change, they often focus on the amount of carbon in the atmosphere and vegetation. But soil contains more carbon than air and plants combined. This means that even a minor change in soil carbon could have major implications for the Earth's atmosphere and climate. New research by Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute scientist Benjamin Turner and colleagues points ... read more


CARBON WORLDS
China's moon rover performs first lunar probe

Internet Radio Provides Musical Space-Weather Reports from NASA's LRO Mission

Moon rover, lander wake after lunar night

India to launch second mission to moon by 2017

CARBON WORLDS
A Decade in the Dust

An Engineer With His Sights on Mars

Lichen on Mars

Megafloods: What They Leave Behind

CARBON WORLDS
Commercial Spaceflight Federation Applauds Passage of Bill Providing Funding for Commercial Programs

NASA Tests Orion Spacecraft Parachute Jettison over Arizona

NASA Space Launch System Could Make 'Outside the Box' Science Missions Possible

NASA Sets Coverage Schedule for TDRS-L/Atlas V Launch Events

CARBON WORLDS
Official: China's space policy open to world

China launches communications satellite for Bolivia

China's moon rover continues lunar survey after photographing lander

China's Yutu "naps", awakens and explores

CARBON WORLDS
Cygnus Work Under Way, Normal Station Operations Continue

Spaceflight, Nanoracks Partnership Launch CubeSat Customers Towards Historic ISS Deployment

Orbital's cargo ship arrives at space station

Obama Administration Extends ISS Until at Least 2024

CARBON WORLDS
NASA's Commercial Crew Partners Aim to Capitalize, Expand on 2013 Successes in 2014

Ariane Flight VA217; Ariane Flight VA216 and Soyuz Flight VS07

2014 set to be a very productive year for collaboration between Arianespace and Italy

Vega Flight VV03 And Ariane Flight VA218

CARBON WORLDS
NASA's Kepler Provides Insights on Enigmatic Planets

Powerful Planet Finder Turns Its Eye to the Sky

New kind of planet or failed star? Astrophysicists discover category-defying celestial object

SF State astronomers discover new planet in Pisces constellation

CARBON WORLDS
ISS delays planned orbit raise due to space junk threat

IBM to invest $1.2 bn to expand 'cloud'

Space fishing: Japan to test 'magnetic net' for space junk

Boeing Space Surveillance System Reduces Risk of Satellite Loss by 66 Percent




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement