Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




WATER WORLD
China submersible breaks 7,000-metre mark
by Staff Writers
Beijing (AFP) June 24, 2012


A manned Chinese submersible broke through the 7,000-metre mark for a new national deep water dive record on Sunday, state media said, as the Asian giant showed off its technological might.

The "Jiaolong" craft reached 7,020 metres (23,031 feet) in the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific Ocean on its fourth dive since arriving in the area earlier this month, state television said.

The dive came on the same day China successfully completed its first manual space docking, a complex manoeuvre that will bring the country a step closer to building a space station.

"This (dive) shows the performance of the submersible is stable," mission chief commander Liu Feng told a live television broadcast from aboard the ship supporting the submersible.

"The level of our technical personnel is getting better and better."

The Jiaolong -- named after a dragon from Chinese mythology -- carried three men into the Mariana Trench, the deepest place in the world, then returned to the choppy surface after nearly 11 hours.

The same submersible reached 5,188 metres in a Pacific dive in July last year. And in a series of three previous dives since June 15, the craft has gone deeper still. Experts say 7,000 metres is the limit of its design.

Other manned submersibles have gone deeper than China's craft. Earlier this year, American film director James Cameron descended almost 11,000 metres to the bottom of the Mariana Trench.

His effort is believed to have at least equalled the record for the deepest manned dive, set by a US Navy officer and a Swiss oceanographer in 1960, according to Guinness World Records.

China intends to use the submersible for scientific research, such as collecting samples of undersea life and studying geological structures, as well as future development of mineral resources, experts say.

On its third dive on Friday, the crew collected samples of water and sediment and took photos of sea life, the official Xinhua News Agency said.

Scientists say the ocean floors contain rich deposits of potentially valuable minerals, but the extreme depths pose technical difficulties in harvesting them on a large scale.

And the stability and durability of the craft presents further difficulties for future operations.

The recent round of dives have seen some technical glitches, such as the breakdown of communications equipment and problems with the adjustable ballast system, state media has reported.

The 7,000 metre dive was previously scheduled for Monday, state media had reported. The reasons for the change of date were unclear but mean the record-setting dive came the same day as China's landmark space manoeuvre.

.


Related Links
Water News - Science, Technology and Politics






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





WATER WORLD
Chinese submersible aims for 23,000 feet
Beijing (UPI) Jun 22, 2012
China's deep-sea submersible Jiaolong, having surpassed the record for the nation's deepest descent, aims to dive to almost 23,000 feet, researchers said. In the deepest of three dives in the Pacific Ocean's Mariana Trench conducted from June 15 to Friday, the submersible reached a depth of 22,800 feet, China's state-run Xinhua news agency reported. All three dives surpassed the ... read more


WATER WORLD
ESA to catch laser beam from Moon mission

Researchers Estimate Ice Content of Crater at Moon's South Pole

Researchers find evidence of ice content at the moon's south pole

Nanoparticles found in moon glass bubbles explain weird lunar soil behaviour

WATER WORLD
NASA tweaks flight path of Mars mission

Extensive Water in Mars Interior

Orbiter Out of Precautionary 'Safe Mode'

Researchers calculate size of particles in Martian clouds of CO2 snow

WATER WORLD
XCOR and Excalibur Almaz sign MOU for suborbital training services

Complex Challenges Solved In Tech Meetings For Commercial Crew Program

Boeing Completes Key Reviews of Space Launch System

Two NASA Visualizations Selected for Computers Graphics Showcase

WATER WORLD
Experts respond to rumors about Shenzhou-9

Staying stimulated in space

China's Hu praises astronauts for space advance

Packing Up Tiangong

WATER WORLD
New Space Station Crew Confirmed

Spacewalk to work on ISS scheduled

Did You Say 1.2 Billion Particles Per Month?

Varied Views from the ISS

WATER WORLD
USAF officials announce milestone Atlas V launch

EVE Underflight Calibration Sounding Rocket Launch

ILS and AsiaSat Announce a New Contract for an ILS Proton Launch

A milestone in launcher preparations for Arianespace's fourth Ariane 5 flight of 2012

WATER WORLD
Forgotten Star Cluster Useful For Solar Science And Search for Earth Like Planets

SciTechTalk: Quick, name the planets!

Where Are The Metal Worlds And Is The Answer Blowing In The Wind

Metal-poor stars are rich with small planets

WATER WORLD
India readies upgrade of 'world's cheapest' tablet

Google to talk tablets, TV, social and more

NuSTAR Mission Status Report: Observatory Unfurls its Unique Mast

Toxic legacy in Malaysia rare-earths village




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement