Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




ECLIPSES
Australian sky-gazers witness 'ring of fire' eclipse
by Staff Writers
Sydney (AFP) May 10, 2013


Sky-gazers were treated to an annular solar eclipse in remote areas of Australia on Friday, with the Moon crossing in front of the Sun to leave a "ring of fire" around its silhouette.

The eclipse, which occurs when the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun but is too close to the Earth to completely cover the Sun, was seen in full across northern Australia, while Sydney saw a partial eclipse.

"It was perfect," said Geoff Sims, who photographed the event from a remote spot in Western Australia.

"It was my first time I had seen an annular eclipse. I thought it was spectacular. I was actually amazed at how beautiful it was," he told AFP.

"It (the Sun) came up in a complete golden ring. Just phenomenal."

From his position about 150 kilometres (93 miles) south of the town of Newman, in Western Australia's Pilbara region, Sims described the moment he saw the Moon travel in front of the Sun, as if it was dancing.

"It is dancing because the Moon pivots around the edge of the Sun," he said.

In November, sky-gazers in Australia witnessed one of nature's greatest phenomena -- a total solar eclipse, when the Moon completely covers the Sun and a faint halo or 'corona' appears.

The rare spectacle, which was viewed live by millions around the world, drew thousands of eclipse tourists to Queensland.

While it took place, the early chatter of birds and animals was replaced by an eerie silence as the Moon overtook the Sun, casting a shadow that plunged the land into darkness, sending temperatures dropping.

A partial eclipse was visible across much of Australia on Friday, with those at the Sydney Observatory watching the Moon take a "bite" out of the Sun.

"What we were able to see was a partial alignment, so at 7:50am this morning the moon slid partially between us and the Sun, kind of like a game of piggy-in-the-middle," said the observatory's Geoffrey Wyatt.

"The Moon blocked part of the Sun... and the tiny little bite got bigger and bigger and bigger as the Moon went between us."

In Sydney, at its maximum the Moon covered some 39 percent of the Sun, but those in the north of the country saw it obscure much more, leaving the Moon surrounded by the thin band of bright sunlight.

The weather was clear for the partial eclipse, which could only be viewed safely through telescopes and binoculars fitted with solar filters.

"All eclipse chasers appreciate that it's always a lottery wherever you go," Wyatt said in regards to the weather, adding that their rarity was a drawcard.

"Partial solar eclipses, they are not common," he told AFP.

"The next total solar eclipse that we get to see in Sydney is in July 2028, so that's a long way off."

.


Related Links
Solar and Lunar Eclipses at Skynightly






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ECLIPSES
Solar Eclipse to Sweep Across Australia, Pacific Islands
Boston MA (SPX) May 01, 2013
An annular eclipse of the Sun, when a ring of everyday Sun remains around the Moon's silhouette, will sweep across the Australian outback and into the Pacific Ocean on the morning of May 10, local time. Though about 95% of the solar disk will be covered, the remaining 5% of Sun will be so bright that the darkening of the sky would hardly be noticeable except to those watching through speci ... read more


ECLIPSES
Where on Earth did the moon's water come from

Water on moon, Earth have a common source

Northrop Grumman Completes Lunar Lander Study for Golden Spike Company

Scientists Use Laser to Find Soviet Moon Rover

ECLIPSES
NASA Curiosity Rover Team Selects Second Drilling Target on Mars

Opportunity Making Smallest Turn Yet, As Dust Storm Affects Rover

More than 78,000 people apply for one-way trip to Mars

Austria Aims For Mars Via Morocco

ECLIPSES
Researchers use graphene quantum dots to detect humidity and pressure

Outside View: Patents laws and suffering innovators

Glow-in-the-Dark Plants on the ISS

Russia Confirms Plans to Send Sarah Brightman to Space

ECLIPSES
China launches communications satellite

On Course for Shenzhou 10

Yuanwang III, VI depart for space-tracking missions

Shenzhou's Shadow Crew

ECLIPSES
Spaceman says goodbye to ISS with David Bowie classic

Canadian ISS astronaut returns to Earth a star

NASA astronauts on spacewalk to fix ammonia leak

The fourth Automated Transfer Vehicle is ready to meet up with its Ariane 5

ECLIPSES
NASA Awards Contract to Modify Mobile Launcher

Angara Rocket Launch Delayed to 2014

ESA's Vega launcher scores new success with Proba-V

European Vega rocket launch delayed due to weather

ECLIPSES
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope Finds Dead Stars Polluted with Planet Debris

The Great Exoplanet Debate

NASA's Spitzer Puts Planets in a Petri Dish

Two New Exoplanets Detected with Kepler, SOPHIE and HARPS-N

ECLIPSES
Heady mathematics

Cornstarch proves to be worth its weight in gold

One order of steel; hold the greenhouse gases

Cloud computing is silver lining for Russian firms




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement