Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















CHIP TECH
Two radio signals, one chip, open a new world for wireless communication
by Staff Writers
Ithaca NY (SPX) Mar 15, 2017


Al Molnar, holding a test board with the two-way transceiver chip mounted in the center, is shown with graduate student Hazal Yuksel in Molnar's lab. Yuksel is co-lead author of the latest paper from the Molnar lab, published earlier this year in the Journal of Solid-State Circuits. Image courtesy Cornell University.

Cornell engineers have devised a method for transmitting and receiving radio signals on a single chip, which could ultimately help change the way wireless communication is done.

Separating the send and receive bands is difficult enough, but the problem is compounded by the ever-increasing number of bands in the latest devices, which handle everything wireless technology has to offer. From GPS to Bluetooth to Wi-Fi, each band requires a filter to stop the strong transmit signals from drowning out reception.

Alyosha Molnar, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering (ECE), and Alyssa Apsel, professor of ECE, have come up with an ingenious way to separate the signals. Their work is described in "A wideband fully integrated software-defined transceiver for FDD and TDD operation," published online in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' Journal of Solid-State Circuits.

Their idea lies in the transmitter - actually a series of six subtransmitters - all hooked into an artificial transmission line. Each of the subtransmitters send signals at regular intervals, and their individually weighted outputs are programmed so that they combine to produce a radio frequency signal in the forward direction, at the antenna port, while canceling out at the receive port.

The programmability of the individual outputs allows this simultaneous summation and cancellation to be tuned across a wide range of frequencies, and to adjust to signal strength at the antenna.

"In one direction, it's a filter and you basically get this cancellation," Apsel said. "And in the other direction, it's an amplifier."

"You put the antenna at one end and the amplified signal goes out the antenna, and you put the receiver at the other end and that's where the nulling happens," Molnar said. "Your receiver sees the antenna through this wire, the transmission line, but it doesn't see the transmit signal because it's canceling itself out at that end."

This work builds on research reported six years ago by a group from Stanford University, which devised a way for the transmitter to filter its own transmission, allowing the weaker incoming signal to be heard. It's the theory behind noise-canceling headphones.

Unlike the Stanford work, the Cornell group's subtransmitter concept will work over a range of frequencies - a positive in this age of scrambling for available frequencies that used to be the realm of over-the-air television.

"This wire is a fairly broadband structure," Molnar said. "And the thing you do to make it work over a wide range of frequencies is just control those different subgains of the transmitters to make this cancellation always happen."

Instead of needing a filter for every band, signal separation can be controlled digitally. Upgrading to the latest version would be like updating an app - as simple as downloading the latest software.

CHIP TECH
Bonding chips using inkjet printers
Washington DC (SPX) Mar 15, 2017
Today in electronics there are two main approaches to building circuits: the rigid one (silicon circuits) and the new, more appealing, flexible one based on paper and polymeric substrates that can be combined with 3-D printing. To date, chips are used to reach the reliable and high electrical performance needed for sophisticated specialized functions. However, for higher complexity systems ... read more

Related Links
Cornell University
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

CHIP TECH
Fly me to the Moon: Russia seeks new cosmonauts

The Second Moon Race

ECLSS Put to the Test for Commercial Crew Missions

Visions of the Future: Planetary Exploration Through 2050

CHIP TECH
Kennedy's Multi-User Spaceport Streamlines Commercial Launches

Designing new rocket engines that don't blow up

Space squadron supports record-breaking satellites launch

Europe launches fourth Earth monitoring satellite

CHIP TECH
Mars Rover Tests Driving, Drilling and Detecting Life in Chile's High Desert

Opportunity Driving South to Gully

NASA Mars Orbiter Tracks Back-to-Back Regional Storms

Paleolake deposits on Mars might look like sediments in Indonesia

CHIP TECH
China Develops Spaceship Capable of Moon Landing

Long March-7 Y2 ready for launch of China's first cargo spacecraft

China Seeks Space Rockets Launched from Airplanes

Riding an asteroid: China's next space goal

CHIP TECH
A Consolidated Intelsat and OneWeb

UK funding space entrepreneurs

Kymeta and Intelsat announce new service to revolutionize how satellite services are purchased

ISRO Makes More Space for Private Sector Participation in Satellite Making

CHIP TECH
Using lasers to create ultra-short pulses

Next-gen steel under the microscope

Aluminium giant Rusal doubles profits

Switching oxygen on and off

CHIP TECH
Mutants in Microgravity

Could fast radio bursts be powering alien probes

Enzyme-free krebs cycle may have been key step in origin of life on Earth

Light From An Ultra-Cool Neighbor

CHIP TECH
NASA Mission Named 'Europa Clipper'

Juno Captures Jupiter Cloudscape in High Resolution

Juno to remain in current orbit at Jupiter

Europa Flyby Mission Moves into Design Phase




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement