Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



TECH SPACE
The multi-colored photons that might change quantum information science
by Staff Writers
Montreal, Canada (SPX) Jul 03, 2017


High-dimensional color-entangled photon states from a photonic chip, manipulated and transmitted via telecommunications systems. Left: Photonic chip including a nonlinear microgravity, used to generate color-entangled photon pairs. Right: Photonic chip connected to optical fiber, allowing the quantum state manipulation with standard telecommunications components. Credit Michael Kues (top image) and INRS University

With leading corporations now investing in highly expensive and complex infrastructures to unleash the power of quantum technologies, INRS researchers have achieved a breakthrough in a light-weight photonic system created using on-chip devices and off-the-shelf telecommunications components.

In their paper published in Nature, the team demonstrates that photons can become an accessible and powerful quantum resource when generated in the form of colour-entangled quDits.

The system uses a small and cost-effective photonic chip fabricated through processes similar to those used for integrated electronics. With an on-chip micro-ring resonator excited by a laser, photons are emitted in pairs that share a complex quantum state.

The photons are constructed in a state featuring a number of superimposed frequency components: The photons have several colours simultaneously, and the colours of each photon in a pair are linked (entangled), regardless of their separation distance.

With each frequency--or colour--representing a dimension, the photons are generated on-chip as a high-dimensional quantum state (quDit). Thus far, quantum information science has largely focused on the exploitation of qubits, based on two-dimensional systems where two states are superimposed (for example, 0 AND 1 at the same time, in contrast to classical bits, which are 0 OR 1 at any time).

Working in the frequency domain allows the superposition of many more states (for example, a high-dimensional photon can be red AND yellow AND green AND blue, although the photons used here were infrared for telecommunications compatibility), enhancing the amount of information in a single photon.

To date, Professor Roberto Morandotti, who leads the INRS research team, confirms the realization of a quantum system with at least one hundred dimensions using this approach, and the technology developed is readily extendable to create two-quDit systems with more than 9,000 dimensions (corresponding to 12 qubits and beyond, comparable to the state of the art in significantly more expensive/complex platforms).

The use of the frequency domain for such quantum states enables their easy transmission and manipulation in optical fibre systems.

"By merging the fields of quantum optics and ultrafast optical processing, we have shown that high-dimensional manipulation of these states is indeed possible using standard telecommunications elements like modulators and frequency filters," stresses telecommunications system expert Professor Jose Azana, co-supervisor of the conducted research.

Until now, advances in established technologies for the telecommunications sector were targeted for the manipulation of classical signals. This research is a game-changer: The advances can be immediately transferred to quantum science and will directly enable fundamental investigations of high-dimensional quantum state characteristics, applications in large-alphabet fibre-based quantum communications, and the future development of frequency-domain, high-dimensional quantum logic gates and other applications.

Leading authors Michael Kues and Christian Reimer note that a highlight of the demonstrated platform is its accessibility: It is easy to build and exploits components used in standard telecommunication systems that are commercially available everywhere. Thus, in the short term, researchers around the world will be able to incorporate and push this technology forward, enabling a leap in the development of practical quantum applications.

Research Report: "On-chip generation of high-dimensional entangled quantum states and their coherent control"

TECH SPACE
A chemical solution to shrink digital data storage
Cleveland OH (SPX) Jun 27, 2017
Chemists at Case Western Reserve University have found a way to possibly store digital data in half the space current systems require. From supercomputers to smartphones, the amount of data people generate and collect continues to grow exponentially, and the need to store all that information grows with it. Computers and other digital devices operate and store data using a binary cod ... read more

Related Links
Institut national de la recherche scientifique
Space Technology News - Applications and Research


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

TECH SPACE
NASA Statement on National Space Council

Silicon-on-Seine: world's biggest tech incubator opens in Paris

India, Portugal Shake Hands on Space Cooperation

Return to the blue

TECH SPACE
Ariane 5 launch proves reliability and flies new fairing

Aerojet Rocketdyne advocates solar electric propulsion as central element of deep space exploration

Modified Proton-M carrier rocket to be first launched in 2019

N. Korea conducts rocket engine test: report

TECH SPACE
Mars Rover Opportunity continuing science campaign at Perseverance Valley

The Niagara Falls of Mars once flowed with lava

Russian Devices for ExoMars Mission to Be Ready in Fall 2017

No One Under 20 Has Experienced a Day Without NASA at Mars

TECH SPACE
China heavy-lift carrier rocket launch fails: state media

Yuanwang-3 completes ship check mission, ready for Chang'e-5 lunar probe launch

China prepares to launch second heavy-lift carrier rocket

China to launch Long March-5 Y2 in early July

TECH SPACE
Second launch doubles number of Iridium NEXT satellites in orbit to 20

HTS Capacity Lease Revenues to Reach More Than $6 Billion by 2025

OneWeb inaugurates production line Assembly, Integration, and Test of OneWeb satellites

SES Restores Capacity from AMC-9 Satellite

TECH SPACE
The sharpest laser in the world

Johns Hopkins scientists develop super-strong metal for next tech frontier

One billion suns: World's brightest laser sparks new behavior in light

Stanford engineers design a robotic gripper for cleaning up space debris

TECH SPACE
Extreme Atmosphere Stripping May Limit Exoplanets' Habitability

NASA diligently tracks microbes inside the International Space Station

Complex Organic Molecules Found On "Space Hamburger"

NASA keeps a close eye on tiny stowaways

TECH SPACE
Mid-infrared images from the Subaru telescope extend Juno spacecraft discoveries

Earth-based Views of Jupiter to Enhance Juno Flyby

NASA's Juno Spacecraft to Fly Over Jupiter's Great Red Spot July 10

Topsy-Turvy Motion Creates Light-Switch Effect at Uranus




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement