Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ROBO SPACE
Study shows need for adaptive powered knee prosthesis to assist amputees
by Staff Writers
Raleigh NC (SPX) Nov 06, 2017


NC State Ph.D. student Andrea Brandt works to test wearable robotics and how they adapt to bearing loads.

New North Carolina State University research into wearable robotics shows how amputees wearing these devices adapted when presented with a real-world challenge: carrying a weighted backpack. The results could assist device manufacturers and clinicians expand the utility of these important devices, and could help researchers develop smarter controllers that adapt to real-world demands.

Andrea Brandt, a Ph.D. student in the NC State and University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, wanted to chart a new course of study on powered devices used to help lower-limb amputees walk. While multiple studies on the efficacy of these devices on level ground have been published, there is a paucity of work that tests these devices in more challenging real-world situations, like bearing additional weight when people carry a load - groceries or a backpack, for example.

"We wanted to first understand how load affects amputees walking with normal prosthesis settings that are typically prescribed in the clinic, and then to what degree different settings could benefit them," Brandt said.

"The device we tested was a powered knee prosthesis - it has a motor to actuate the knee and a fixed ankle joint. We programmed multiple settings that provided individually tuned mechanics in load-bearing and non-load-bearing conditions. We evaluated both how these settings and how carrying a load would change our study participants' gait and self-reported exertion rates."

Five people of varied ages and physical attributes were recruited to take part in the study. After walking on a lab treadmill both with and without a backpack adding 20 percent of their body weight, and with or without the load-bearing power settings, the study subjects reported having more difficulties when carrying the load with the prosthetic device set at the normal setting.

"Perceived exertion definitely increased, the device would hyperextend, and people relied more on their intact limb, which is already being overused," Brandt said. "Those problems were reduced when the device was set to the load-bearing setting."

Interestingly, participants didn't report many difficulties with either prosthetic setting when not carrying the backpack.

"Carrying a load makes your muscles contract in different ways that aren't being mimicked in prostheses today," Brandt said.

"So we think load-adaptive devices could make an important difference for amputees. Imagine if the device was smart enough to automatically change the prosthesis parameters to fit any situation where we interact with the environment - carrying different amounts of load, walking on sand or grass - and how much more amputees might be able to rely on their prosthesis in their everyday life. This is the next stage of work in our lab."

Brandt adds that the small study size may not reflect the entire amputee population, but instead highlights the need to consider more real-world tasks in prosthetics research.

In the future, Brandt will work to address the larger issue of how to get more function out of powered devices for amputees. Finding the right control parameters and settings are part of the answer, she says, since that's what mostly determines how these devices behave.

"In the long run, we want prostheses to be smarter and more functional, so amputees can rely on their prosthetic limb more, get more out of it in their daily life, get back to the activities that they love, and potentially prevent the development of secondary health issues - like osteoarthritis and back pain - that develop from having to rely more on their intact side," Brandt said.

Research Report: "Interactions Between Transfemoral Amputees and a Powered Knee Prosthesis During Load Carriage"

ROBO SPACE
Physics boosts artificial intelligence methods
Pasadena CA (SPX) Oct 19, 2017
Researchers from Caltech and the University of Southern California (USC) report the first application of quantum computing to a physics problem. By employing quantum-compatible machine learning techniques, they developed a method of extracting a rare Higgs boson signal from copious noise data. Higgs is the particle that was predicted to imbue elementary particles with mass and was discovered at ... read more

Related Links
North Carolina State University
All about the robots on Earth and beyond!


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

ROBO SPACE
How Does Your Space Garden Grow

NanoRacks Deploys Second Kaber-Class Microsatellite This Week, First On-Orbit Assembly

Saudi Arabia to invest $1 billion in Virgin Galactic

Scientist devises a solar reactor to make water and oxygen from moon rocks

ROBO SPACE
Arianespace to launch Embratel Star One D2

What Ever Happened to Sea Launch?

SpaceX launches Korean satellite, sticks rocket landing

Arianespace to launch Inmarsat's fifth Global Xpress satellite

ROBO SPACE
Next Mars Rover Will Have 23 'Eyes'

In desert of Oman, a gateway to life on Mars

Winters leave marks on Mars' sand dunes

Winters on Mars are shaping the Red Planet's landscape

ROBO SPACE
Space will see Communist loyalty: Chinese astronaut

China launches three satellites

Mars probe to carry 13 types of payload on 2020 mission

UN official commends China's role in space cooperation

ROBO SPACE
New Chinese sat comms company awaits approval

Myanmar to launch own satellite system-2 in 2019: vice president

Eutelsat's Airbus-built full electric EUTELSAT 172B satellite reaches geostationary orbit

Turkey, Russia to Enhance Cooperation in the Field of Space Technologies

ROBO SPACE
Liquids take a shine to terahertz radiation

Voltage-driven liquid metal fractals

Jellyfish-inspired electronic skin glows when it gets hurt

One-step 3-D printing of catalysts developed at Ames Laboratory

ROBO SPACE
Overlooked Treasure: The First Evidence of Exoplanets

Scientists discover new type of deep-sea hunting called kleptopredation

'Monster' planet discovery challenges formation theory

One small doorstep for man: Cosmic mat welcomes aliens

ROBO SPACE
Jupiter's X-ray auroras pulse independently

Haumea, the most peculiar of Pluto companions, has a ring around it

Ring around a dwarf planet detected

Helicopter test for Jupiter icy moons radar




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement