Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



ROCKET SCIENCE
SpaceX hails 'revolution' after recycled rocket launch, landing
By Kerry SHERIDAN
Miami (AFP) March 31, 2017


SpaceX chief Elon Musk hailed a "revolution in spaceflight" on Thursday after blasting off a recycled rocket for the first time, a feat that could dramatically lower the cost of space travel.

Experts cheered the launch and landing of the previously used booster as a "historic" moment for spaceflight, particularly private industry, as companies like SpaceX and its competitors scramble to make space exploration cheaper and more efficient.

The slightly scuffed Falcon 9 rocket soared into the sky over Cape Canaveral, Florida at 6:27 pm (2227 GMT), on a mission to send a communications satellite for Luxembourg-based company SES into a distant orbit.

Its tall, columnar portion known as the first stage, or booster, had already propelled the unmanned Dragon cargo ship to space in April 2016.

About 10 minutes after launch, screams and applause erupted at SpaceX mission control in Hawthorne, California as the re-used rocket powered its engines and landed upright on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean marked with the words "Of Course I Still Love You."

The landing marked the ninth successful touchdown of a first stage rocket for SpaceX -- six on ocean platforms, or drone ships, and three on land.

It also marked the first time a single rocket booster had ever been launched -- and landed -- twice.

SpaceX, the California-based company headed by visionary entrepreneur Musk, has for 15 years been honing the technology of powering its boosters back to careful Earth landings on solid ground and in the water.

The goal of the entire effort, Musk has said, is to make rocket parts just as reusable as cars, planes or bicycles.

He said it is also a crucial part of his plan to one day establish human colonies on Mars.

"It is an amazing day, I think, for space (and) as whole for the space industry," Musk said in a video message after the launch.

"It means you can fly and refly an orbital class booster which is the most expensive part of the rocket," he added.

"This is going to be ultimately a huge revolution in spaceflight."

Currently, millions of dollars' worth of rocket parts are jettisoned after each launch.

SpaceX officials have said that reusing hardware could slash costs -- with each Falcon 9 launch costing over $61 million -- by about 30 percent.

While the exact life of the re-used boosters is uncertain, Musk said they could be redeployed anywhere from 10 to 100 or even 1,000 times, depending on how much refurbishment is needed.

SpaceX competitor Blue Origin, run by Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos, has also successfully landed its New Shepard booster after launch, by powering its engines to guide it down for a controlled, upright landing.

- 'Flight-proven' -

Praise and congratulations for SpaceX poured in on Twitter.

"Congratulations on another historic launch," the US space agency NASA wrote on Twitter.

"Congrats, SpaceX," said the Defense Advances Research Projects agency (DARPA).

"DARPA facilitated the first SpaceX launch, and now commercial space is coming into its own."

As for the cost of Thursday's launch, Martin Halliwell, chief technology officer at SES, has declined to say publicly the exact amount.

However, he dismissed "naysayers" this week and stressed the historic nature of the launch on what he has described as a "flight-proven" rocket.

"People said we were taking a huge risk. I always said, 'We're not.'" he told reporters after Thursday's launch.

"We had access to information that gave us confidence," he said, adding he was "hugely excited" that SpaceX was opening "the door to a whole new era of spaceflight."

Musk said the booster that flew Thursday underwent extensive refurbishment prior to launching again, and that it will be donated to NASA to put on display at Cape Canaveral.

The SES-10 satellite was sent to a geostationary transfer orbit, flying as high as 22,000 miles (35,000 kilometers) above Earth.

The satellite aims to expand television, internet and mobile connections across Latin America.

SES confirmed that the launch had successfully deployed its satellite, and congratulated SpaceX on sticking the landing of the rocket.

ksh/mdo

AMAZON.COM

JEFFERIES GROUP

ROCKET SCIENCE
SpaceX launches first recycled rocket
Miami (AFP) March 30, 2017
SpaceX is poised to launch its first recycled rocket on Thursday, using a booster that sent food and supplies to the astronauts living at the International Space Station in April. The goal of the launch, scheduled for 6:27 pm (2227 GMT) from Cape Canaveral, Florida, is to send a communications satellite for Luxembourg-based company SES into a distant orbit. Standing tall at the NASA laun ... read more

Related Links
Rocket Science News at Space-Travel.Com


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

ROCKET SCIENCE
United Launch Alliance Completes Crew Emergency Egress System

Spacewalkers Connect Adapter for Commercial Crew Vehicles

Robot Fedor to Guide Russia's Federation Spacecraft in Maiden Flight - Roscosmos

CRESST Signs $87M Cooperative Agreement with NASA Goddard

ROCKET SCIENCE
SpaceX hails 'revolution' after recycled rocket launch, landing

Kremlin Believes Russia Can Compete With Private Firms Like SpaceX in Space

US Hardware Production Begins for Money-Saving Next-Generation Rockets

'Fuzzy' fibers can take rockets' heat

ROCKET SCIENCE
New MAVEN findings reveal how Mars' atmosphere was lost to space

Potential Mars Airplane Resumes Flight

Prolific Mars Orbiter Completes 50,000 Orbits

Final two ExoMars landing sites chosen

ROCKET SCIENCE
Yuanwang fleet to carry out 19 space tracking tasks in 2017

China Develops Spaceship Capable of Moon Landing

Long March-7 Y2 ready for launch of China's first cargo spacecraft

China Seeks Space Rockets Launched from Airplanes

ROCKET SCIENCE
Vietnam set to produce satellites by 2022

Globalsat Sky and Space Global sign MoU for testing and offering satellite service in Latin America

OneWeb Satellites breaks ground on high-volume satellite manufacturing facility

Start-Ups at the Final Frontier

ROCKET SCIENCE
Spray-on memory could enable bendable digital storage

Space blanket floats away during historic spacewalk

NASA laser communications to provide Orion faster connections

Canadian subs to receive Kelvin Hughes' SharpEye radars

ROCKET SCIENCE
TRAPPIST-1 flares threaten possibility of habitability on surrounding exoplanets

Inventing Tools for Detecting Life Elsewhere with Future Telescopes

Viruses in the oceanic basement

Researchers uncover a potent genetic element in Earth's smallest life forms

ROCKET SCIENCE
Neptune's movement from the inner to the outer solar system was smooth and calm

Four unknown objects being investigated in Planet X

New Horizons Halfway from Pluto to Next Flyby Target

ANU leads public search for Planet X




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement