Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. 24/7 Space News .




SATURN DAILY
Saturn and its Largest Moon Reflect Their True Colors
by Staff Writers
Boulder CO (SPX) Aug 30, 2012


A giant of a moon appears before a giant of a planet undergoing seasonal changes in this natural color view of Titan and Saturn from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI.

Posing for portraits for NASA's Cassini spacecraft, Saturn and its largest moon, Titan, show spectacular colors in a quartet of images being released. One image captures the changing hues of Saturn's northern and southern hemispheres as they pass from one season to the next. A wide-angle view in the package captures Titan passing in front of Saturn, as well as the planet's changing colors.

Upon Cassini's arrival at Saturn eight years ago, Saturn's northern winter hemisphere was an azure blue. Now that winter is encroaching on the planet's southern hemisphere and summer on the north, the color scheme is reversing: blue is tinting the southern atmosphere and is fading from the north.

The other three images depict the newly discovered south polar vortex in the atmosphere of Titan, reported recently by Cassini scientists. Cassini's visible-light cameras have seen a concentration of yellowish haze in the detached haze layer at the south pole of Titan since at least March 27.

Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer spotted the massing of clouds around the south pole as early as May 22 in infrared wavelengths.

After a June 27 flyby of the moon, Cassini released a dramatic image and movie showing the vortex rotating faster than the moon's rotation period. The four images being released were acquired in May, June and July of 2012.

Some of these views, such as those of the polar vortex, are only possible because Cassini's newly inclined - or tilted - orbits allow more direct viewing of the polar regions of Saturn and its moons.

Scientists are looking forward to seeing more of the same - new phenomena like Titan's south polar vortex and changes wrought by the passage of time and seasons - during the remainder of Cassini's mission.

"Cassini has been in orbit now for the last eight years, and despite the fact that we can't know exactly what the next five years will show us, we can be certain that whatever it is will be wondrous," said Carolyn Porco, imaging team lead based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

Launched in 1997, Cassini went into orbit around Saturn on July 1, 2004. It is in its second mission extension, known as the Solstice Mission, and one of its main goals is to analyze seasonal changes in the Saturn system.

"It is so fantastic to experience, through the instruments of Cassini, seasonal changes in the Saturn system," said Amanda Hendrix, deputy project scientist, based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

"Some of the changes we see in the data are completely unexpected, while some occur like clockwork on a seasonal timescale. It's an exciting time to be at Saturn."

.


Related Links
Cassini at JPL
Cassini images
Explore The Ring World of Saturn and her moons
Jupiter and its Moons
The million outer planets of a star called Sol
News Flash at Mercury






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





SATURN DAILY
Giant Ice Avalanches On Iapetus Provide Clue To Extreme Slippage Elsewhere In The Solar System
St. Louis MO (SPX) Jul 30, 2012
"We see landslides everywhere in the solar system," says Kelsi Singer, graduate student in Earth and planetary sciences in Arts and Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, "but Saturn's icy moon Iapetus has more giant landslides than any body other than Mars." The reason, says William McKinnon, PhD, professor of Earth and planetary sciences, is Iapetus' spectacular topography. "Not ... read more


SATURN DAILY
Russia's moonshot hope 'not a dream'

A "Blue Moon" Heralds the Harvest

New research eclipses existing theories on moon formation

Apollo 11 capsule stirs Neil Armstrong memories, tributes

SATURN DAILY
Mars suitable for colonization

Curiosity Rover Plays First Song Transmitted from Another Planet

NASA Curiosity Rover Begins Eastbound Trek on Martian Surface

Rover Leaves Tracks in Morse Code

SATURN DAILY
Manned interplanetary missions on NASA's agenda

Space race, on a budget, was not how Armstrong saw it

Research and Technology Studies 2012

Singer Sarah Brightman could be next space tourist: report

SATURN DAILY
China eyes next lunar landing as US scales back

China unveils ambitious space projects

Is China Going to Blast Past America in Space?

Hong Kong people share joy of China's manned space program

SATURN DAILY
Dragon Spacecraft Set to Make Second Run for ISS

Europe's ATV-3 Space Freighter Raises ISS Orbit to 420 km

Russia's ISS Crew Members Complete Spacewalk

Sierra Nevada Supports Communications Experiment on ISS

SATURN DAILY
NASA launches mission to explore radiation belts

ISRO to score 100 with a cooperative mission Sep 9

NASA Administrator Announces New Commercial Crew And Cargo Milestones

Ariane 5s are on the move for Arianespace's upcoming missions

SATURN DAILY
NASA, Texas astronomers find first multi-planet system around a binary star

Planet search moves to Antarctica

Evaporating Planet Has a Comet Tail

Search for alien life gets boost at twin star

SATURN DAILY
Publishers ink $69 mn deal in ebook price-fixing case

Sony tablet takes aim at Microsoft Surface

Apple, Samsung 'tablet war' overshadows Berlin tech show

Synchronized lasers measure how light changes matter




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement