Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















STATION NEWS
Russian spacewalk marks end of ESA's exposed space chemistry
by Staff Writers
Paris (ESA) Feb 04, 2016


Installing the Expose-R2 facility on the International Space Station. As part of ESA's Expose-R2 project, 46 species of bacteria, fungi and arthropods are inside those containers as they spend 18 months bolted to the outside of the International Space Station. The vacuum of space is sucking out the water, oxygen and other gases in the samples. Their temperature can drop to -12 C as the Station passes through Earth's shadow, rising to 40 C at other times, and undergoing a similar process to the freeze-drying used to preserve foods. The Expose experiments are exploring the limits of terrestrial life, whether the organisms can survive in space and how the full blast of solar radiation is affecting accompanying chemicals. Image courtesy Roscosmos.

ESA's Expose facility was retrieved from outside the International Space Station by cosmonauts Yuri Malenchenko and Sergei Volkov, who were completing a spacewalk to place new experiments on the outpost's hull.

Expose is a series of chemistry laboratories that place samples in the harsh environment of space unprotected. Subjected to vacuum, radiation, temperature differences and the full blast of our Sun's energy, 46 species of small organisms and over 150 organic compounds have returned after spending 18 months bolted to the Zvezda module.

Having travelled around the world over 8500 times, researchers are eager to see how the organisms and chemical samples have endured their trip. Inspecting the organisms back on Earth could help in the search for alien life while chemical analysis will help researchers understand how molecules react to space travel.

Astrochemistry on the Space Station
The building blocks of life on Earth, organic chemicals, could have landed on our planet via meteorites after travelling millions of years through space. Most chemical compounds are not stable but over time break down to form different molecules.

The chemistry experiment that is part of the Expose facility, called Photochemistry on the Space Station (PSS), is investigating which chemicals we find on Earth could have come from space.

Lead investigator Herve Cottin, from the University of Paris-Est Creteil, explains: "Expose is nothing less than a little chemistry box to help us better understand chemical reactions in space. If a molecule survives 18 months in space then it could come to Earth from space.

"If a molecule has changed after its 18-month voyage then we know that space travel filters our observations on Earth and a chemical might have formed from a different configuration."

This research has implications for data gathered from other space missions such as comet-chaser Rosetta or Titan probe Huygens, or the upcoming ExoMars mission.

These spacecraft and rover provide researchers with information on the chemicals they detect as they explore our Solar System. On those distant worlds, solar radiation is not filtered by our atmosphere, so their chemistries could be quite different to that on our planet.

Of the 150 samples are on Expose-R2, half are in direct sunlight and another half were protected from the Sun. Another 225 samples have been kept on Earth in varying conditions as a control.

Thirty researchers from 11 laboratories in the Netherlands, Italy, France and USA started on this project in 2009, and the samples will return to Earth on a Soyuz spacecraft soon for analysis.

.


Related Links
Principia at ESA
Station at NASA
Station and More at Roscosmos
S.P. Korolev RSC Energia
Watch NASA TV via Space.TV
Space Station News at Space-Travel.Com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
STATION NEWS
New Tool Provides Successful Visual Inspection of ISS Robot Arm
Greenbelt MD (SPX) Feb 01, 2016
Gas station attendant, electronics installer, home inspector: is there any fix-it job that NASA's Robotic Refueling Mission (RRM) can't tackle during its four-year career? As NASA takes a break in RRM operations, it's looking back on past achievements and celebrating one of its latest accomplishments - the successful inspection of Canadarm2, the International Space Station's (ISS) robotic arm. I ... read more


STATION NEWS
Phase of the moon affects amount of rainfall

Lunar Flashlight selected to fly as secondary payload on Exploration Mission-1

Russia postpones manned Lunar mission to 2035

Audi joins Google Lunar XPrize competition

STATION NEWS
Sandy Selfie Sent from NASA Mars Rover

4 people to live in an HERA habitat for 30 days at JSC

Getting real - on Mars

Opportunity Reaches 12 Years on Mars!

STATION NEWS
Innovations in the Air

Astronaut rescue exercise proves Det. 3 command, control ready to support DoD, NASA

Challenger disaster at 30: Did the tragedy change NASA for the better?

Voyager Mission Celebrates 30 Years Since Uranus

STATION NEWS
Last Launch for Long March 2F/G

China aims for the Moon with new rockets

China shoots for first landing on far side of the moon

Chinese Long March 3B to launch Belintersat-1 telco sat for Belarus

STATION NEWS
New Tool Provides Successful Visual Inspection of ISS Robot Arm

Russian Cosmonauts to Attach Thermal Insulation to ISS

Astronaut Scott Kelly plays ping pong with water

Japanese astronaut learned Russian to link two nations

STATION NEWS
NASA tests solar sail deployment for asteroid-surveying CubeSat NEA Scout

Space Launch System's first flight will launch small Sci-Tech cubesats

ILS Proton Successfully Launches Eutelsat 9B for Eutelsat

Pentagon Can't Overcome Its Russian Engines Addiction: McCain

STATION NEWS
Astronomers discover largest solar system

Lonely Planet Finds a Mum a Trillion Km Away

Follow A Live Planet Hunt

Lab discovery gives glimpse of conditions found on other planets

STATION NEWS
NASA's ICESat-2 equipped with unique 3-D manufactured part

Novel 4-D printing method blossoms from botanical inspiration

Will Space Debris be Responsible for World War III?

NASA Engineers Tapped to Build First Integrated-Photonics Modem




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.