Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




EARTH OBSERVATION
EO May Increase Survival Of 'Uncontacted' Tribes
by Staff Writers
Columbia MO (SPX) Apr 27, 2014


Members of an uncontacted tribe in the Brazilian state of Acre, as seen from satellite images. Photo courtesy of Government of Brazil.

Lowland South America, including the Amazon Basin, harbors most of the last indigenous societies that have limited contact with the outside world. Studying these tribes, located deep within Amazonian rainforests, gives scientists a glimpse at what tribal cultures may have been like before the arrival of Europeans.

Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have used satellite images to assess the demographic health of one particular village of isolated people on the border between Brazil and Peru. Remote surveillance is the only method to safely track uncontacted indigenous societies and may offer information that can improve their chances for long-term survival.

Rob Walker, an assistant professor of anthropology in the College of Arts and Science at MU, collaborated with Marcus Hamilton, postdoctoral fellow at the Santa Fe Institute and adjunct assistant professor of anthropology at the University of New Mexico.

They used Google Earth satellite imagery to estimate the area of the fields and the size of the village belonging to the tribe, as well as the living area of the tribe's temporary housing, and compared that with similar estimates for 71 other Brazilian indigenous communities.

"We found that the estimated population of the village is no more than 40 people," Walker said. "A small, isolated village like this one faces an imminent threat of extinction. However, forced contact from the outside world is ill-advised, so a non-invasive means of monitoring the tribe is recommended.

A remote surveillance program using satellite images taken periodically of this group would help track the movements and demographic health of the population without disrupting their lives."

Using information captured from remote surveillance, scientists can help shape policies that mitigate the threats of extinction including deforestation, illegal mining and colonization in these remote areas.

Additionally, surveillance also can help locate isolated villages, track patterns of migration over time, and inform and create boundaries or buffer zones that would allow tribes to stay isolated, Walker said.

"Close to 100 uncontacted groups are thought to currently exist in Amazonia," Walker said. "Deforestation, cattle ranching, illegal mining, and outside colonization threaten their existence. Most of these tribes are swidden horticulturalists and so their slash-and-burn fields are observable in satellite images.

But, they do move around, sometimes in response to external threats, and this movement requires constant monitoring if there is to be any hope of preserving their habitat and culture."

The study, "Amazonian societies on the brink of extinction," was published online in The American Journal of Human Biology. Financial support for this project was provided by a National Geographic Society Research and Exploration grant.

.


Related Links
University of Missouri
Earth Observation News - Suppiliers, Technology and Application






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





EARTH OBSERVATION
Kazakh EO satellite to be launched into orbit
Paris (AFP) April 24, 2014
Kazakhstan's first-ever Earth observation satellite is to be fired into orbit next week from the European spaceport in Kourou in French Guiana, launch company Arianespace said. The 830-kilogramme (1,829-pound) orbiter will provide Kazakhstan with data for mapmaking and security, monitor changes in nature and agriculture, and provide support for rescue operations in case of natural disaster, ... read more


EARTH OBSERVATION
Astrobotic Partners With NASA To Develop Robotic Lunar Landing Capability

John C. Houbolt, Unsung Hero of the Apollo Program, Dies at Age 95

NASA Completes LADEE Mission with Planned Impact on Moon's Surface

Russia plans to get a foothold in the Moon

EARTH OBSERVATION
ISS research shows that hardy little space travelers could colonize Mars

Target on Mars Looks Good for NASA Rover Drilling

Mars Rover Switches to Driving Backwards Due to Elevated Wheel Currents

Mission to Mars

EARTH OBSERVATION
NASA's Next Prototype Spacesuit has a Brand New Look, and it's All Thanks to You

NASA Invests in Hundreds of US Small Businesses to Enable Future Missions

Orion Undergoes Simulation Of Intense Launch Vibrations

Orion Exploration Design Challenge Winner Announced

EARTH OBSERVATION
China issues first assessment on space activities

China launches experimental satellite

Tiangong's New Mission

"Space Odyssey": China's aspiration in future space exploration

EARTH OBSERVATION
NASA Seeks to Evolve ISS for New Commercial Opportunities

Astronauts Complete Short Spacewalk to Replace Backup Computer

No Official Confirmation of NASA Severing Ties with Russian Space Agency

Astronauts Prep for Spacewalk as Mission Managers Evaluate Busy Schedule

EARTH OBSERVATION
Replacing Russian-made rocket engines is not easy

Parallel Ariane 5 and Soyuz mission campaigns keep Arianespace on track

SHERPA launch service deal to deploy 1200 kilo smallsat payloads

ILS Satellite Launches Remain on Schedule Despite Sanctions

EARTH OBSERVATION
Length of Exoplanet Day Measured for First Time

Spitzer and WISE Telescopes Find Close, Cold Neighbor of Sun

Alien planet's rotation speed clocked for first time

Seven Samples from the Solar System's Birth

EARTH OBSERVATION
TV terrifies and compels with viruses and robots

Newly Identified 'Universal' Property of Metamagnets May Lead to Everyday Uses

Big data poses great challenges and opportunities for databases

Researchers Develop Harder Ceramic for Armor Windows




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.