Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















Possible Progenitor Of Special Supernova Type Detected

Possible detection of a binary star system that was later destroyed in a supernova. Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/MPE/R. Voss et al. Optical: NASA/GSFC/Swift
by Staff Writers
Boston MA (SPX) Feb 15, 2008
Using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, scientists have reported the possible detection of a binary star system that was later destroyed in a supernova explosion. The new method they used provides great future promise for finding the detailed origin of these important cosmic events.

In an article appearing in the February 14th issue of the journal Nature, Rasmus Voss of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany and Gijs Nelemans of Radboud University in the Netherlands searched Chandra images for evidence of a much sought after, but as yet unobserved binary system - one that was about to go supernova. Near the position of a recently detected supernova, they discovered an object in Chandra images taken more than four years before the explosion.

The supernova, known as SN 2007on, was identified as a Type Ia supernova. Astronomers generally agree that Type Ia supernovas are produced by the explosion of a white dwarf star in a binary star system. However, the exact configuration and trigger for the explosion is unclear. Is the explosion caused by a collision between two white dwarfs, or because a white dwarf became unstable by pulling too much material off a companion star?

Answering such questions is a high priority because Type Ia supernovas are major sources of iron in the Universe. Also, because of their nearly uniform intrinsic brightness, Type Ia supernova are used as important tools by scientists to study the nature of dark energy and other cosmological issues.

"Right now these supernovas are used as black boxes to measure distances and derive the rate of expansion of the universe," said Nelemans. "What we're trying to do is look inside the box."

If the supernova explosion is caused by material being pulled off a companion star onto the white dwarf, fusion of this material on the surface of the star should heat the star and produce a strong source of X-radiation prior to the explosion. Once the supernova explosion occurs, the white dwarf is expected to be completely destroyed and then would be undetectable in X-rays. In the merger scenario, the intensity of X-ray emission prior to the explosion is expected to be much weaker.

Based on the detection of a fairly strong X-ray source at approximately the position of SN 2007on 4 years before the explosion, Voss and Nelemans conclude that the data support the scenario where matter is pulled off a companion star. The small number of X-ray sources in the field implies that there is only a small chance of an unrelated source being so close by coincidence. Also, the X-ray source has similar properties to those expected for fusion on a white dwarf, unlike most X-ray sources in the sky.

However, in follow-up studies, Voss, Nelemans and colleagues Gijs Roelofs (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass.) and Cees Bassa (McGill University, Canada) used higher-quality optical images to better determine the supernova's position. This work, which is not yet published, shows a small, but significant difference in the measured positions of the supernova and the X-ray source, suggesting the source may not be the progenitor.

Follow-up Chandra observations hint that the X-ray object has disappeared, but further observations are needed to finally decide whether the source was the progenitor or not. The team is also applying this new method to other supernovas and has high hopes that they will eventually succeed in identifying the elusive cause of at least some of these explosions.

"We're very excited about opening up a new way of studying supernovas, even though we're not sure that we've seen this particular stellar bomb before it exploded," said Gijs Roelofs. "We're very confident that we'll learn alot more about these important supernovas in the future."

Voss agrees that, even if the X-ray source is not found to be the progenitor of SN 2007on, the hunt is worth the effort.

"Finding the progenitor to one of these Type Ia supernovas is a great chase in astronomy right now," he said. "These supernovas are great tools for studying dark energy, but if we knew more about how they form they might become even better tools."

Rasmus Voss receives support from the Excellence Cluster Universe in Garching, Germany. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass.

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
Chandra X-ray Observatory
Stellar Chemistry, The Universe And All Within It



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


Record-busting supernova prompts new ideas on death of stars
Paris (AFP) Nov 14, 2007
Astronomers analysing the brightest supernova ever detected say the titanic flare has reshaped thinking about the death struggle of gigantic stars.







  • Predicting The Radiation Risk To ESA's Astronauts
  • All systems go for SKorea's space-ready kimchi
  • Canadian Astronauts Julie Payette And Robert Thirsk To Go On Space Missions In 2009
  • Doctors Give Green Light For Flight Of Next Space Tourist

  • Still Grinding After All These Years Makes For Much Opportunity
  • NASA Budget Request Strong On Earth Weak On Mars
  • ESA Presents Mars In 3D
  • Mars In Their Sights

  • ILS Proton Launches THOR 5 Satellite
  • Bigelow Aerospace And Lockheed Martin Converging On Terms For Launch Services
  • USAF Awards United Launch Alliance Three Delta IV Missions
  • Vandenberg Prepares For First Atlas V Launch

  • Indonesia To Develop New EO Satellite
  • Russia To Launch Space Project To Monitor The Arctic In 2010
  • New Radar Satellite Technique Sheds Light On Ocean Current Dynamics
  • SPACEHAB Subsidiary Wins NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory Contract

  • ASU Research Solves Solar System Quandary
  • Happy Second Birthday New Horizons
  • The PI's Perspective: Autumn 2007: Onward to the Kuiper Belt
  • Data For The Next Generations

  • Possible Progenitor Of Special Supernova Type Detected
  • The Spinning Magnet Of A Sun-Like Star
  • Astronomers Eye Ultra-Young, Bright Galaxy In Early Universe
  • Spitzer Catches Young Stars In Their Baby Blanket Of Dust

  • India's Moon Mission Likely To Be Put Off To June
  • India to announce lunar mission date this month
  • NASA Recruiting Volunteers For Out Of This World Jobs
  • Volcanic deposits may aid lunar outposts

  • modu And Tele Atlas Join Forces To Combine Mobile Connectivity And Personal Nav Content
  • US Marines Select Rockwell Collins ParaNav
  • GPS For The Prostate: System Keeps Radiation Therapy On Target
  • Graybar Delivery Advantage Program To Help Customers Better Manage Incoming Material

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement