Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. 24/7 Space News .




EARLY EARTH
New evidence for warm-blooded dinosaurs
by Staff Writers
Adelaide, Australia (SPX) Jul 22, 2013


Saltwater crocodiles reach over a tonne in weight and, being about 50% muscle, have a reputation for being extremely powerful animals.

University of Adelaide research has shown new evidence that dinosaurs were warm-blooded like birds and mammals, not cold-blooded like reptiles as commonly believed.

In a paper published in PLoS ONE, Professor Roger Seymour of the University's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, argues that cold-blooded dinosaurs would not have had the required muscular power to prey on other animals and dominate over mammals as they did throughout the Mesozoic period.

"Much can be learned about dinosaurs from fossils but the question of whether dinosaurs were warm-blooded or cold-blooded is still hotly debated among scientists," says Professor Seymour.

"Some point out that a large saltwater crocodile can achieve a body temperature above 30 C by basking in the sun, and it can maintain the high temperature overnight simply by being large and slow to change temperature.

"They say that large, cold-blooded dinosaurs could have done the same and enjoyed a warm body temperature without the need to generate the heat in their own cells through burning food energy like warm-blooded animals."

In his paper, Professor Seymour asks how much muscular power could be produced by a crocodile-like dinosaur compared to a mammal-like dinosaur of the same size.

Saltwater crocodiles reach over a tonne in weight and, being about 50% muscle, have a reputation for being extremely powerful animals.

But drawing from blood and muscle lactate measurements collected by his collaborators at Monash University, University of California and Wildlife Management International in the Northern Territory, Professor Seymour shows that a 200 kg crocodile can produce only about 14% of the muscular power of a mammal at peak exercise, and this fraction seems to decrease at larger body sizes.

"The results further show that cold-blooded crocodiles lack not only the absolute power for exercise, but also the endurance, that are evident in warm-blooded mammals," says Professor Seymour.

"So, despite the impression that saltwater crocodiles are extremely powerful animals, a crocodile-like dinosaur could not compete well against a mammal-like dinosaur of the same size.

"Dinosaurs dominated over mammals in terrestrial ecosystems throughout the Mesozoic. To do that they must have had more muscular power and greater endurance than a crocodile-like physiology would have allowed."

His latest evidence adds to that of earlier work he did on blood flow to leg bones which concluded that the dinosaurs were possibly even more active than mammals.

.


Related Links
University of Adelaide
Explore The Early Earth at TerraDaily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





EARLY EARTH
Earth's Gold Came from Colliding Dead Stars
Cambridge, MA (SPX) Jul 19, 2013
We value gold for many reasons: its beauty, its usefulness as jewelry, and its rarity. Gold is rare on Earth in part because it's also rare in the universe. Unlike elements like carbon or iron, it cannot be created within a star. Instead, it must be born in a more cataclysmic event - like one that occurred last month known as a short gamma-ray burst (GRB). Observations of this GRB provide ... read more


EARLY EARTH
Engine recovered from Atlantic confirmed as Apollo 11 unit

Soviet Moon rover moved farther than thought

Scientist says Earth may once have been orbited by two moons

Dust hazard for Moon missions: scientists

EARLY EARTH
Reports Detail Mars Rover Clues to Atmosphere's Past

MAVEN Spectrometer Opens Window to Red Planet's Past

Curiosity Mars Rover Passes Kilometer of Driving

How Mars' atmosphere got so thin: New insights from Curiosity

EARLY EARTH
The Zero Gravity Coffee Cup

Outside View: Future science fiction

New Flight Projects Building Boasts First NASA Goddard 'Green' Roof

Technology Could Curtail Astronaut Conflict

EARLY EARTH
Medical quarantine over for Shenzhou-10 astronauts

China's astronauts ready for longer missions

Chinese probe reaches record height in space travel

China's space tracking ship Yuanwang-5 berths at Jakarta for replenishment

EARLY EARTH
Space Station ARISS Software Upgraded by Student For Students

Astronaut's helmet leak forces abrupt end to spacewalk

NASA puzzled as astronaut's helmet leak halts spacewalk

Luca, the orbital repair man

EARLY EARTH
Alphasat stacks up

ESA Signs Off On Baseline Configuration Of Ariane 6

Alphasat and INSAT 3D fueled for Ariane 5 heavy lift dual launch

Special group to be set up for inspecting production of Proton-M carrier rockets

EARLY EARTH
A snow line in an infant solar system: Astronomers take first images

In the Zone: The Search For Habitable Planets

Snow in an Infant Planetary System

UM Researchers Land NASA Grant to Search Space for Exoplanets

EARLY EARTH
Unusual material expands dramatically under pressure

Milikelvins drive droplet evaporation

Stanford scientists break record for thinnest light-absorber

Penn researchers help show new way to study and improve catalytic reactions




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement