Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




CHIP TECH
New Bandwidth Management Techniques Boost Operating Efficiency In Multi-Core Chips
by Staff Writers
Raleigh, NC (SPX) May 27, 2011


File image.

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed two new techniques to help maximize the performance of multi-core computer chips by allowing them to retrieve data more efficiently, which boosts chip performance by 10 to 40 percent. To do this, the new techniques allow multi-core chips to deal with two things more efficiently: allocating bandwidth and "prefetching" data.

Multi-core chips are supposed to make our computers run faster. Each core on a chip is its own central processing unit, or computer brain.

However, there are things that can slow these cores. For example, each core needs to retrieve data from memory that is not stored on its chip. There is a limited pathway - or bandwidth - these cores can use to retrieve that off-chip data.

As chips have incorporated more and more cores, the bandwidth has become increasingly congested - slowing down system performance.

One of the ways to expedite core performance is called prefetching. Each chip has its own small memory component, called a cache. In prefetching, the cache predicts what data a core will need in the future and retrieves that data from off-chip memory before the core needs it. Ideally, this improves the core's performance.

But, if the cache's prediction is inaccurate, it unnecessarily clogs the bandwidth while retrieving the wrong data. This actually slows the chip's overall performance.

"The first technique relies on criteria we developed to determine how much bandwidth should be allotted to each core on a chip," says Dr. Yan Solihin, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at NC State and co-author of a paper describing the research. Some cores require more off-chip data than others.

The researchers use easily-collected data from the hardware counters on each chip to determine which cores need more bandwidth. "By better distributing the bandwidth to the appropriate cores, the criteria are able to maximize system performance," Solihin says.

"The second technique relies on a set of criteria we developed for determining when prefetching will boost performance and should be utilized," Solihin says, "as well as when prefetching would slow things down and should be avoided."

These criteria also use data from each chip's hardware counters. The prefetching criteria would allow manufacturers to make multi-core chips that operate more efficiently, because each of the individual cores would automatically turn prefetching on or off as needed.

Utilizing both sets of criteria, the researchers were able to boost multi-core chip performance by 40 percent, compared to multi-core chips that do not prefetch data, and by 10 percent over multi-core chips that always prefetch data.

The paper, "Studying the Impact of Hardware Prefetching and Bandwidth Partitioning in Chip-Multiprocessors," will be presented June 9 at the International Conference on Measurement and Modeling of Computer Systems (SIGMETRICS) in San Jose, Calif. The paper was co-authored by Dr. Fang Liu, a former Ph.D. student at NC State. The research was supported, in part, by the National Science Foundation.

"Studying the Impact of Hardware Prefetching and Bandwidth Partitioning in Chip-Multiprocessors" Authors: Fang Liu and Yan Solihin, North Carolina State University

.


Related Links
North Carolina State University
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CHIP TECH
New electronics material closer to commercial reality
West Lafayette, IN (SPX) May 26, 2011
Researchers have developed a method for creating single-crystal arrays of a material called graphene, an advance that opens up the possibility of a replacement for silicon in high-performance computers and electronics. Graphene is a one-atom-thick layer of carbon that conducts electricity with little resistance or heat generation. The arrays could make possible a new class of high-speed tr ... read more


CHIP TECH
NASA-Funded Scientists Make Watershed Lunar Discovery

Moon may have more water than believed: study

President Kennedy's Speech and America's Next Moonshot Moment

Twin GRAIL Spacecraft to Launch Site by Lockheed Martin

CHIP TECH
Mars Formed Rapidly into Runt of Planetary Litter

NASA's Spirit Rover Completes Mission on Mars

Sibling rivalry: Why Mars became a planetary runt

Mars Science Laboratory Mission Status Report

CHIP TECH
ATV-4 to carry name Albert Einstein

New deep space vehicle to be based on Orion: NASA

NASA Announces Key Decision For Next Deep Space Transportation System

Welcome home, Paolo!

CHIP TECH
Venezuela, China to launch satellite next year

Top Chinese scientists honored with naming of minor planets

China sees smooth preparation for launch of unmanned module

China to attempt first space rendezvous

CHIP TECH
Final Endeavour spacewalk marks 1,000 hours of station EVAs

Fourth and Final Shuttle Astronaut Spacewalk Set

Astronauts test new exercises on space walk

Spacewalkers Outfit Station

CHIP TECH
ASTRA 1N delivered to French Guiana

Russia sends two Soyuz carrier rockets to French Guiana

ILS Proton Successfully Launches Telstar 14R And Estrela do Sul 2 for Telesat

Satellites for Asia and India are orbited on Arianespace's third Ariane 5 mission of 2011

CHIP TECH
Kepler's Astounding Haul of Multiple-Planet Systems Just Keeps Growing

Bennett team discovers new class of extrasolar planets

Climate scientists reveal new candidate for first habitable exoplanet

Free-Floating Planets May be More Common Than Stars

CHIP TECH
Tablets, 3D in focus at future-shaping Taiwan IT show

China to establish rare earths exchange

Expert discovers simple method of dealing with harmful radioactive iodine

West Coast Radar Network is World's Largest




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement