Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



STELLAR CHEMISTRY
MIT team design $100 handheld muon detector
by Staff Writers
Boston MA (SPX) Nov 23, 2017


MIT physicists have designed a pocket-sized cosmic ray muon detector to track these ghostly particles. The detector can be made with common electrical parts, and when turned on, it lights up and counts each time a muon passes through. The relatively simple device costs just $100 to build, making it the most affordable muon detector available today.

At any given moment, the Earth's atmosphere is showered with high-energy cosmic rays that have been blasted from supernovae and other astrophysical phenomena far beyond the Solar System. When cosmic rays collide with the Earth's atmosphere, they decay into muons - charged particles that are slightly heavier than an electron.

Muons last only fractions of a second, and during their fleeting lifespan they can be found through every layer of the Earth's atmosphere, circulating in the air around us and raining onto the surface at a rate similar to a light drizzle. A small fraction of muons can even penetrate the Earth's surface and travel several kilometers through rock and ice.

Now physicists at MIT have designed a pocket-sized cosmic ray muon detector to track these ghostly particles. The detector can be made with common electrical parts, and when turned on, it lights up and counts each time a muon passes through. The relatively simple device costs just $100 to build, making it the most affordable muon detector available today.

The researchers, led by Spencer Axani, a graduate student in MIT's Department of Physics, have designed the detector with students in mind. They have started an outreach program called CosmicWatch, with a website that lists parts to purchase and detailed instructions on how to assemble, calibrate, and run the detector. The team estimates that an average high school student should spend about four hours building a detector for the first time, and just one hour building it a second time.

Once up and running, detectors can be carried around to measure muon rates in virtually any environment. The team has helped supply nearly 100 detectors to high school and college students, who have sent the instruments up in planes and weather balloons to measure muon rates at high altitudes. Students have also, as Axani has done, taken the detectors underground.

"You get funny looks when you take particle detectors into the subway, but we did that in Boston," Axani says. "Since the muon rate will decrease the further down you go, we put the detectors in a subway station to measure how far underground we were."

The researchers have published the first version of the detector design in the American Journal of Physics. Axani's co-authors are MIT professor of physics Janet Conrad and junior Conor Kirby. Details regarding their latest version can be found on the CosmicWatch webpage.

Treasure in trash
Axani originally intended to build a small, handheld muon detector as a miniature add-on to IceCube, a huge particle detector encased in ice, deep underground at the South Pole. IceCube is designed to detect subatomic particles called neutrinos.

Scientists at the observatory proposed that a small muon detector might be inserted into PINGU (Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade), a proposed array that would increase the detector's sensitivity to low-energy neutrinos. Small muon detectors, buried in such an array, would be able to tag the precise position of muons, enabling scientists to sift out those particles in their search for neutrinos.

Axani took on the task of designing a prototype muon detector for use in PINGU. Typical muon detectors consist of photomultiplying tubes lined with a scintillator, a material that emits light when struck by a charged particle. When a particle such as a muon bounces through the detector, the photomultiplying tube multiplies the current produced by the emitted light. In this way, even a single photon can make a current large enough that it can be measured. This is used to determine whether a muon or other particle has passed through the detector.

While most lab-scale muon detectors are made from large, bulky photomultipliers and even larger batteries to power them, Axani looked for ways to shrink the design.

After digging through discarded electronics equipment at MIT, he found the components he needed to build a much thinner device, requiring very little power.

He also designed simple electronics and software components to display the number of muons passing through the detector, making the detector a self-contained measurement and readout instrument.

A project takes flight
Since Axani first attempted to design a prototype, his project has morphed into more of an outreach effort, as he's realized the components used to build the detector are relatively common, easily accessible, and simple to assemble - all ideal qualities for teaching students hands-on particle physics.

He, Conrad, and a colleague at the National Center for Nuclear Research in Poland, K. Frankiewicz, have assembled kits for students, which can be used to build individual handheld detectors about the size of a large cellphone. Each kit includes a piece of plastic scintillator, a SensL silicon photomultiplier, an Arduino Nano, a readout screen, a custom-designed printed circuit board, and a 3-D-printed casing, available in a rainbow of colors.

The team has supplied kits to students at the University of Warsaw in Poland, as well as the Missouri University of Science and Technology, where students have built an array of the detectors and sent them up in weather balloons to measure muons at high altitudes. Students have also taken the detectors onto planes to measure the different muon counts at various altitudes.

"At sea level, you might see one count every two seconds at sea level, but on a plane at cruising altitude, that rate increases by about a factor of 50 - a dramatic change," Axani says. "From the measured rate you can back-calculate what the actual altitude of the plane was."

A group at Boston University is also investigating the possibilities of placing the muon detectors in suborbital rockets, reaching altitudes of 100,000 feet.

"When you get up high enough, you get out of the muon production region of cosmic rays, and you can start seeing the turnover, where rates of muons increase at a certain altitude and then start decreasing beyond a certain altitude," Conrad says.

Eventually, the researchers would like to apply their pocket detector as a means of muon tomography, a technique that uses the distribution of muons to create a three-dimensional image of the amount of material surrounding a detector. Scientists in the past have used muon tomography instruments, much like X-rays or CT scans, to uncover geological structures, the most famous of which was an effort in the 1960s to search for hidden chambers in the Pyramid of Chephren, in Giza.

"That's something I'd like to try out at some point, maybe to map out the office on the floor above me," Axani says. "For now I like to take these detectors in my briefcase and measure the muon rate when I'm travelling."

The researchers will continue to offer kits on the CosmicWatch website, along with instructions for how to assemble and apply them. They also hope to collect feedback from students and educators who have used the kits.

"This is a really neat example of how pretty esoteric physics can produce something which is directly useful," Conrad says.

Research Report: The desktop muon detector: A simple, physics-motivated machine-and-electronics-shop project for university students

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
How physicists turned Antarctica into particle detector
Moscow (Sputnik) Nov 16, 2017
Alexander Novikov, senior researcher at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, explained to RIA Novosti why Russian researchers and their colleagues at NASA travel to Antarctica every year to launch unusual "hot-air balloons," and shared his experiences living near the South Pole. Every year researchers from the University of Hawaii, NASA, National Research Nuclear University MEPh ... read more

Related Links
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Stellar Chemistry, The Universe And All Within It


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Does the Outer Space Treaty at 50 need a rethink

NASA to send critical science, instruments to Space Station

New motion sensors major step towards cheaper wearable technology

Can a magnetic sail slow down an interstellar probe

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Flat-Earther's self-launch plan hits a snag

Aerojet Rocketdyne supports ULA Delta II launch of JPSS-1

Old Rivals India, China Nurture New Rivalry in Satellite Launch Business

NASA launches next-generation weather satellite

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Gadgets for Mars

Ice shapes the landslide landscape on Mars

Previous evidence of water on Mars now identified as grainflows

Winds Blow Dust off the Solar Panels Improving Energy Levels

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Nation 'leads world' in remote sensing technology

China plans for nuclear-powered interplanetary capacity by 2040

China plans first sea based launch by 2018

China's reusable spacecraft to be launched in 2020

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Need to double number of operational satellites: ISRO chief

Space Launch plans UK industry tour

Astronaut meets volcano

European Space Week starts in Estonia

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Booming life for 'PUBG' death-match computer game

3rd SES bids farewell to ANGELS satellite

New way to write magnetic info could pave the way for hardware neural networks

Borophene shines alone as 2-D plasmonic material

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
First known interstellar visitor is an 'oddball'

Lava or Not, Exoplanet 55 Cancri e Likely to have Atmosphere

Images of strange solar system visitor peel away some of the mystery

Familiar-Looking Messenger from Another Solar System

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Pluto's hydrocarbon haze keeps dwarf planet colder than expected

Jupiter's Stunning Southern Hemisphere

Watching Jupiter's multiple pulsating X-ray Aurora

Help Nickname New Horizons' Next Flyby Target




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement