Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















CARBON WORLDS
Iron dissolved by air pollution may increase ocean potential to trap carbon
by Staff Writers
Birmingham UK (SPX) Mar 03, 2017


File image.

Iron particles generated by cities and industry are being dissolved by man-made air pollution and washed into the sea - potentially increasing the amount of greenhouse gases that the world's oceans can absorb, a new study suggests.

Scientists have long believed that acids formed from human-generated pollution and natural emissions dissolve iron in airborne particles - increasing the amount of iron to the ocean - but have lacked direct evidence to prove this theory.

Now, iron-rich particles from steel manufacturing and coal burning, collected in the East China Sea, have been found to have a thick sulphate coating containing soluble iron that provides the 'smoking gun' to prove the theory of acid iron dissolution.

Scientists at the University of Birmingham (UK) and Shandong University (China) led an international research partnership with counterparts from universities in US and Japan. The work was funded by the Natural Science Foundation of China and the UK's Natural Environmental Research Council. The team published their findings in Science Advances.

Dr Zongbo Shi, the corresponding author of this work, at the University of Birmingham said: "Air pollution dissolves iron in aerosols, which may help to fertilize the oceans. We know that air pollution seriously damages human health and terrestrial ecosystems but this 'new' source of soluble iron can potentially increase the amount of carbon dioxide stored in the oceans and, thus, inadvertently offset global warming."

Professor Weijun Li, the lead author of this work, at Shandong University added: "The detection of iron sulphate mixed within the sulphate coatings which we analysed provides the 'smoking gun' for acid dissolution because there is no other atmospheric source or process that leads to its formation."

Scientists collected three types of iron-bearing particles from the Yellow Sea, the northern part of the East China Sea located between mainland China and the Korean Peninsula. Sophisticated microscopic instruments were used to look for iron-containing nanoscale particles - specifically locating them from thousands of aerosol particles.

Researchers showed that iron-rich, fly ash, and mineral dust particles had travelled from the Asian continent. Most of the iron-rich and fly ash particles contained a significant amount of sulphate containing soluble iron.

Most atmospheric sulphur dioxide in East Asia is emitted from coal combustion and industry, whilst the bulk of sulphate particles in the Northern Hemisphere are formed from sulphur dioxide caused by human activities.

The research team, thus, confirmed that the iron rich sulphate particles found in the Yellow Sea are formed by contact with man-made sulphur dioxide. The research shows that the airborne particles became acidic after being transported to the Yellow Sea.

"Human activities may have led to an increase of atmospherically soluble iron in the oceans by several times since the Industrial Revolution, which could have a major impact on how effective our oceans are regulating our climate," added Dr Shi.

"Controlling air pollution will bring huge benefits to human welfare but it may reduce the amount of nutrients to the surface ocean and, thus, the ocean carbon uptake rate. More work needs to be done to quantify the impact of anthropogenic soluble iron on ocean ecosystems and climate."

CARBON WORLDS
Three layers of graphene reveals a new kind of magnet
Mumbai, India (SPX) Feb 28, 2017
Metals have a large density of electrons and to be able to see the wave nature of electrons one has to make metallic wires that are only a few atoms wide. However, in graphene - one atom thick graphite - the density of electrons is much smaller and can be changed by making a transistor. As a result of the low density of electrons the wave nature of electrons, as described by quantum mechanics, i ... read more

Related Links
University of Birmingham
Carbon Worlds - where graphite, diamond, amorphous, fullerenes meet

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

CARBON WORLDS
India has capability to develop space station, says top official

Orion spacecraft achieves key safety milestone

The NASA Imager Dentists Use Daily

Marshall shakes, packs, ships and tracks NASA payloads

CARBON WORLDS
Blue Origin shares video of New Glenn rocket

Europe launches fourth Earth monitoring satellite

Elon Musk: tech dreamer reaching for sun, moon and stars

ULA launches NROL-79 payload for NRO

CARBON WORLDS
New evidence for a water-rich history on Mars

Humans May Quickly Evolve on Mars, Biologist Claims

NASA Orbiter Steers Clear of Mars Moon Phobos

Remnants of a mega-flood on Mars

CARBON WORLDS
Riding an asteroid: China's next space goal

China's 1st cargo spacecraft to make three rendezvous with Tiangong-2

China to launch space station core module in 2018

Thinking Big: China Hopes to Conduct 2nd Mission to Mars by 2030

CARBON WORLDS
Iridium Safety Voice Communications Installs Surge Past 500 Aircraft

Eutelsat Signs up for Blue Origin's New Glenn Launcher

Turkey Moves Closer to Launching Own Space Agency

OneWeb, Intelsat merge to advance satellite internet

CARBON WORLDS
Aireon and Thales Begin Validation of Space-Based ADS-B Data

Space surveillance radar system fully operational

Coffee-ring effect leads to crystallization control

3-D printing with plants

CARBON WORLDS
Hunting for giant planet analogs in our own backyard

Faraway Planet Systems Are Shaped Like the Solar System

Biochemical 'fossil' shows how life may have emerged without phosphate

The missing link in how planets form

CARBON WORLDS
Juno to remain in current orbit at Jupiter

Europa Flyby Mission Moves into Design Phase

NASA receives science report on Europa lander concept

New Horizons Refines Course for Next Flyby




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement