Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



TECH SPACE
Ground Control Satellite Dish Arrives at University of Leicester
by Staff Writers
Leicester UK (SPX) May 03, 2017


Dr. Bannister added: "The ground station is a core part of the mission development and training facility which we began work on seven years ago. The installation of the ground station is a major milestone in this project; not only is it a very visible demonstration of the University's commitment to sustaining and expanding its role as a major space research institute, but for me, it's extremely gratifying to see the concept change from plans in a computer model, to a real facility, with all of the opportunities it represents. I'm very grateful to colleagues, particularly in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and in the University Estates team, for supporting the project.

Scientists at the University of Leicester are a step closer to controlling their own satellite missions now that a new satellite ground station dish has been installed on campus. The University oversaw the visually impressive installation of a satellite ground station, a facility which orbiting spacecraft use to transmit their data back to Earth, on the roof of its Physics and Astronomy Building in April.

The roof has been reinforced in preparation to receive the system. It's 2.4 metre satellite dish is now visible to all working at, studying at and visiting the department, which has been at the forefront of space research for over 50 years.

The installation process was completed in two parts: the base first, then the reflecting dish, and by the end of the day the iconic 'satellite dish' profile was visible in the University skyline. The installation of the electronics, which will make finally make the station operational, will come at a later date.

The station is controlled from a new facility which is being built within the department, for space mission design, operations and training.

At 2.4 metres in diameter, the dish is much larger than most satellite TV systems and is designed to receive a range of types of data. The University of Leicester system is also steerable - it can 'lock on' to satellites passing overhead, and moves quickly to keep them in view.

Because of this, special safety precautions like barriers and emergency stop buttons, will be placed around the dish to protect people working on the roof of the building, where it is being installed. Another difference between this system and a typical satellite TV dish is that it is capable of transmitting signals to satellites as well as receiving signals from them.

Dr. Nigel Bannister from the Department of Physics and Astronomy, who has worked to bring the ground station to a reality for the past seven years, said: "We are installing the satellite ground station to support space research, space missions, and training.

The Department of Physics and Astronomy has a long history of involvement in space research and space missions, as well as in the training of the next generation of space scientists and engineers, but until now it hasn't had an on-site capability to send and receive data from missions it has been involved with. That changes with the installation of this facility.

"The ground station gives us a completely new capability to conduct research relating to space mission operations, space weather, and a range of other fields. Leicester has a long and illustrious track record in space mission involvement, and the ground station adds a new capability which we're in an excellent position to exploit.

"From the teaching perspective, it's very rare for students to have direct access to facilities like this, to receive and analyse data coming from satellites in real time as they pass overhead, and to be able to explore concepts like orbital mechanics in a practical way using real spacecraft.

"We'll be incorporating experimental activities with our ground station into our teaching programme, enabling students to gain direct insight into these concepts, and to acquire skills that are directly relevant to future careers in sectors including space research, telecommunications, and electronics engineering.

"We are also going to use this system for a unique and powerful approach to training in space mission operations and communications, as part of our plans for the development of a nationally significant space park in Leicester."

The dish will allow the Department to provide data reception and command transmission capability for future missions that it is involved in. These missions are likely to include small satellites built at Leicester, designed to study the Earth's aurora and the way that the stream of particles from the Sun (called the "solar wind") affects important systems on Earth, such as communications and satellite navigation systems.

The space scientists will also study ways in which large numbers of ground stations can be used in a coordinated way, to improve the way data are transmitted from space to the ground, as well as using the station to communicate with stratospheric balloon flights where scientists can perform small experiments and test future space technologies at 30-40 km altitude.

Dr. Bannister added: "The ground station is a core part of the mission development and training facility which we began work on seven years ago. The installation of the ground station is a major milestone in this project; not only is it a very visible demonstration of the University's commitment to sustaining and expanding its role as a major space research institute, but for me, it's extremely gratifying to see the concept change from plans in a computer model, to a real facility, with all of the opportunities it represents. I'm very grateful to colleagues, particularly in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and in the University Estates team, for supporting the project.

"And I'm pleased that we've been able to support UK business in the process - the ground station was produced by Surrey-based CGC Technology Ltd, whose systems are in use around the world."

TECH SPACE
Tiny Probes Hold Big Promise for Future NASA Missions
Moffett Field CA (SPX) Apr 20, 2017
Sometimes to find the best solution to a big problem, you have to start small. A team of NASA engineers has been working on a new type of Thermal Protection System (TPS) for spacecraft that would improve upon the status quo. Having seen success in the laboratory with these new materials, the next step is to test in space. The Conformal Ablative Thermal Protection System, or CA-TPS, will be ... read more

Related Links
University Of Leicester
Space Technology News - Applications and Research


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

TECH SPACE
12 Scientist-Astronaut Candidates Graduate at Embry-Riddle Through Project PoSSUM

Elon Musk teases future plans at TED

Students Taste Sweet Smell of Success in Culinary Challenge

Honeywell And Paragon To Create Life Support Technology For Future NASA Space Missions

TECH SPACE
SpaceX makes first US military launch, then lands rocket again

Strike-delayed European rocket launch to go ahead

India to launch GSAT-9 communication satellite on May 5: ISRO

SpaceX launches classified payload for NRO; 1st Stage returns to LZ-1

TECH SPACE
Japan aims to uncover how moons of Mars formed

Several drives put opportunity closer to 'Perseverance Valley'

Is Anything Tough Enough to Survive on Mars

How Old are Martian Gullies

TECH SPACE
Reach for the Stars: China Plans to Ramp Up Space Flight Activity

China to conduct several manned space flights around 2020

China's cargo spacecraft completes in-orbit refueling

China courts international coalition set up to promote space cooperation

TECH SPACE
How Outsourcing Your Satellite Related Services Saves You Time and Money

ViaSat-2 Satellite to Launch on June 1

ESA boosting its Argentine link with deep space

Arianespace, Intelsat and SKY Perfect JSAT sign a new Launch Services Agreement, for Horizons 3e

TECH SPACE
Why space dust emits radio waves upon crashing into a spacecraft

Ground Control Satellite Dish Arrives at University of Leicester

Raytheon receives $327M radar contract for U.S. Navy

SES Offers Panoramic Glimpse into the Future of TV with Live Virtual Reality Demo

TECH SPACE
SOFIA Confirms Nearby Planetary System Is Similar to Our Own

Nearby Star Confirmed as Good Model of Our Early Solar System

Next Breakthroughs in Exoplanet Discovery

Research Center A Hub For Origins of Life Studies

TECH SPACE
The PI's Perspective: No Sleeping Back on Earth!

ALMA investigates 'DeeDee,' a distant, dim member of our solar system

Nap Time for New Horizons

Hubble spots auroras on Uranus




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement