Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




CLIMATE SCIENCE
Global October temperatures record high for month: US
by Staff Writers
Washington (AFP) Nov 20, 2014


Global temperatures in October, as well as for the entire calendar year so far, were the hottest on average since record-keeping began in 1880, the US government said Thursday.

It was the 38th consecutive October in which global average temperatures were higher than the average for the 20th century, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported.

"The January-October combined global land and ocean average surface temperature was the warmest such period on record, surpassing the previous record set in 1998 and 2010," NOAA said.

The combined average temperature over land and ocean surfaces in October was 58.43 degrees Fahrenheit (14.74 degrees Celsius), which beat the previous record for the month by 0.02 degrees Fahrenheit (0.01 degrees Celsius).

Warmer than average temperatures were recorded over most of the Earth's land surface, except for large parts of Central Asia.

"Record warmth was notable across a large area of southern South America, the US western coastal regions, Far East Russia, parts of southern and southeastern Asia, much of southern and western Australia, and parts of southern Europe," it said.

The average October temperatures globally over land alone were the month's fifth highest on record.

The global sea surface temperature was 61.72 degrees Fahrenheit in October, the highest on record for the month and the sixth consecutive monthly high, NOAA said.

"Record warmth was observed in parts of every major ocean basin. Nearly all of the Indian Ocean was record warm or much warmer than average, it said."

- Polar sea ice shrinks -

In the Arctic, the average extent of sea ice in October was the sixth smallest for the month since record-keeping began in 1979.

Antarctic sea ice also declined in October, ending a string of six consecutive months of increasing sea ice in the region.

Australia experienced its second warmest October since records began in 1910, behind only 1998, with record-high maximum daytime temperatures that averaged 4.97 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1961-1990 average, NOAA said.

"Several countries in Europe reported October temperatures among their 10 warmest, including France, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Germany, and Austria," it added.

The contiguous United States meanwhile observed its fourth warmest October since national records began, at 3.0F (1.7C) above the 20th century average, the federal agency said.

UN climate experts have cautioned there is no time to lose in the battle against global warming, which UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has labelled "the defining issue of our times".

Earlier this month, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned that time is running out to limit warming to two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) by 2100 from pre-industrial levels.

It said Earth is on a trajectory to warm up by at least four degrees Celsius -- a recipe for melting ice caps, extreme weather, habitat and species loss and conflict for resources.

After years that saw little progress in climate talks, the world's two biggest economies and top polluters, China and the United States, agreed on November 12 to new targets for lowering their respective greenhouse gas emission.

Leaders of the 28-nation European Union, the third-largest greenhouse gas producer, have meanwhile pledged to cut its emissions by at least 40 percent by 2030 from 1990 levels.

.


Related Links
Climate Science News - Modeling, Mitigation Adaptation






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CLIMATE SCIENCE
Jurassic climate was far more complex than previously known
Dallas TX (SPX) Nov 19, 2014
The climate 150 million years ago of a large swath of the western United States was more complex than previously known, according to new research from Southern Methodist University, Dallas. It's been held that the climate during the Jurassic was fairly dry in New Mexico, then gradually transitioned to a wetter climate northward to Montana. But based on new evidence, the theory of a gradual ... read more


CLIMATE SCIENCE
U.K. group to crowd-source funding for moon mission

After Mars, India space chief aims for the moon

China examines the three stages of lunar test run

China gears up for lunar mission after round-trip success

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Mars was warm enough for flowing water, but only briefly

Several Drives Push Opportunity Over 41-Kilometer Mark

Lockheed Martin Begins Final Assembly Of Next Mars Lander

China researchers plan Mars mission 'around 2020': state media

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Tencent looks to the final travel frontier

ESA Commissions Airbus As contractor For Orion Service Module

Study Investigates How Men and Women Adapt Differently to Spaceflight

S3 concludes first phase of drop-tests

CLIMATE SCIENCE
China launches new remote sensing satellite

China publishes Earth, Moon photos taken by lunar orbiter

China plans to launch about 120 applied satellites

Mars probe to debut at upcoming air show

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Space station gets zero-gravity 3-D printer

NASA Commercial Crew Partners Continue System Advancements

Europe's 3D printer set for ISS

Astronaut turned Twitter star, Reid Wiseman, back on Earth

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Soyuz Installed at Baikonur, Expected to Launch Wednesday

Time-lapse video shows Orion's move to Cape Canaveral launch pad

SpaceX chief Musk confirms Internet satellite plan

Orbital recommits to NASA Commercial program and Antares

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Follow the Dust to Find Planets

NASA's TESS mission cleared for next development phase

ADS primes ESA's CHEOPS to detect and classify exoplanets

NASA's TESS Mission Cleared for Next Development Phase

CLIMATE SCIENCE
Cooling with the coldest matter in the world

Boeing Stacks Two Satellites to Launch as a Pair

Eurofighter unveils 1.0-billion-euro radar upgrade

An efficient method to measure residual stress in 3D printed parts




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.