Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




SPACE TRAVEL
Feud on Earth but peace in space for US and Russia
By Max DELANY
Moscow (AFP) March 26, 2015


Hundreds of kilometres below on Earth, their governments are locked in a standoff over Ukraine -- but up in space, Russian cosmonauts and American astronauts are still working together side by side.

The International Space Station (ISS) is one of the rare areas of US-Russian cooperation that has not been hit by the Ukraine crisis and in the latest show of commitment, the next joint mission is set to blast off from Kazakhstan on Friday.

The crew will include two space veterans -- American Scott Kelly and Russian Mikhail Kornienko -- who are down to become the first people to spend a whole year straight on the cosmic outpost, rather than the usual six months.

"We do our work that we love and we respect each other," Russian cosmonaut Alexander Samokutyaev said of life aboard the ISS after returning to Earth this month.

"Whatever the politicians want to get up to, that is their business," he told journalists at a press conference just after landing.

First launched as an international project back in 1998, the station was heralded as a symbol of the cooperation that emerged from the Cold War rivalry of the space race between the Soviet Union and United states.

And while the research outpost may technically be divided into Russian and American sections the truth, analysts say, is that neither country can run it on their own.

"The US and Russia need each other," American expert John Logsdon, a member of NASA's Advisory Council, told AFP.

- 'Like a marriage' -

"It is like a marriage where divorce is almost impossible."

Since ending its Space Shuttle flights, the US has been dependent on Russian rockets to take astronauts and vital supplies to the space station, especially since the explosion of a commercial rocket in October cast doubt over a NASA deal to use private firms.

Meanwhile the American sector supplies the power to run the whole project and the Russian cosmonauts often rely on NASA's superior communications system to talk to Earth.

"Even though we are butting heads on Earth, up on the ISS we can't work without them and they can't work without us," Russian space expert Vadim Lukashevich told AFP.

"It's impossible to break up this cooperation."

As tensions over Ukraine spiralled, fears mounted that it was only a matter of time before the worst East-West standoff since the collapse of Communism would hit the space programme.

The US briefly blocked exports of certain defence-linked technologies to Russia that some thought would affect the cooperation in space.

But rather than affect work on the ISS, the Ukraine crisis might actually have helped cement it for the longer term.

Russia last month confirmed that it will continue using the International Space Station in partnership with NASA until 2024.

NASA had already said the ageing ISS will remain operational until 2024 but Moscow had threatened to pull out and stop financing it by 2020.

However, as Russia's economy has suffered economic strife in part due to sanctions imposed by the West over Ukraine, Moscow realised that it could no longer spare the cash to go it alone.

"Why did we decide to stay on the ISS until 2024? The answer is because we had no other option. The crisis also hit us," said Russian expert Lukashevich.

- Mars barred -

While cooperation on the station looks set to continue, it is likely that the next stage of space exploration -- aimed at eventually putting someone on Mars -- will be hit by deteriorating relations.

Beyond 2024, when the work on the ISS is set to end, as the situation stands now it seems unlikely that the two sides will agree on any major projects.

And experts say that without international cooperation, dreams of flying a manned mission to Mars will struggle to take off, or face lengthy delays at the very least.

For those being blasted into space now, that is a bitter pill to swallow.

They are hoping their governments can put aside current differences on Earth to bolster mankind's exploration of space for future generations.

"As to the International Space Station, it's a priceless experiment in international cooperation. We are learning to work together, and in my opinion the next step is interplanetary exploration of space, the moon or Mars," said Kornienko, the cosmonaut who is set to spend a year in space, in an interview on NASA's website.

"It's impossible to do it with one country alone, and the experience from international cooperation on the ISS will be very important here."

burs-del/am/ach/erf


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Space Tourism, Space Transport and Space Exploration News






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





SPACE TRAVEL
Expandable addition on ISS will gather data for future space habitats
Houston TX (SPX) Mar 18, 2015
NASA and Bigelow Aerospace are preparing to launch an expandable habitat module to the International Space Station this year. The agency joined Bigelow Thursday at its Las Vegas facility to mark completion of the company's major milestones. The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, or BEAM, leverages key innovations in lightweight and compact materials, departing from a traditional rigid met ... read more


SPACE TRAVEL
Extent of Moon's giant volcanic eruption is revealed

Yutu Changes Everything We Thought We Knew About Our Moon

Extent of moon's giant volcanic eruption is revealed

NASA's LRO Spacecraft Finds March 17, 2013 Impact Crater and More

SPACE TRAVEL
Ancient Martian lake system records 2 water-related events

Curiosity Rover Finds Biologically Useful Nitrogen on Mars

NASA's Opportunity Mars Rover Passes Marathon Distance

NASA Reformats Memory of Longest-Running Mars Rover

SPACE TRAVEL
50 years ago today, space welcomed its first sandwich

Small Staff has Big Impact Showing How NASA Can Engage Students

TED Prize winner wishes for archive of human wisdom

The Science Of The Start-Up

SPACE TRAVEL
China completes second test on new carrier rocket's power system

China's Yutu rover reveals Moon's "complex" geological history

China's Space Laboratory Still Cloaked

China has ability but no plan for manned lunar mission: expert

SPACE TRAVEL
One-Year Crew Set for Launch to Space Station

Russia, US May Sign New Deal to Send Astronauts to ISS

Lockheed Martin reveals new method for resupplying space station

Testing astronauts' lungs in Space Station airlock

SPACE TRAVEL
Arianespace selected by Airbus to launch EDRS-C Satellite

US to Scrap Delta IV Launch Vehicle in Favor of Russian-Made Rocket

Proton launches Express AM-7 satellite for Russian Government

DoD Works to Build Competition Into Space Launches

SPACE TRAVEL
Our Solar System May Have Once Harbored Super-Earths

SOFIA Finds Missing Link Between Supernovae and Planet Formation

ESA's CHEOPS Satellite: The Pharaoh of Exoplanet Hunting

Some habitable exoplanets could experience wildly unpredictable climates

SPACE TRAVEL
Ground broken for Space Fence installation

Data structures influence speed of quantum search in unexpected ways

New optical materials break digital connectivity barriers

Japan military eyes recruits with cutesy smartphone game




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.