Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















ESA Signs For Small GEO Satellite Platform

The Small Geostationary Satellite initiative is aimed at the development of a small, European, general-purpose telecommunications satellite platform, capable of supporting a payload mass of up to 300 kg and payload power of 3 kW, and the launch of a satellite mission to provide flight qualification and in orbit demonstration for the platform. The Small Geostationary Satellite initiative (ARTES-11 programme) is the result of the decision taken by ESA member states in the Council at Ministerial level held in December 2005 to support the development a new European satellite platform product line for small geostationary communication satellites. Credits: OHB Technology GmbH
by Staff Writers
Berlin, Germany (ESA) Mar 29, 2007
ESA has signed with OHB/Germany a 100 million euro framework contract to develop a European Small Geostationary Satellite platform for telecommunication missions.

This contract covers the first part of the Small Geostationary Satellite initiative aimed at the definition of a general-purpose small geostationary satellite platform which will enable European players to compete effectively on the commercial telecommunications market for small platforms.

To achieve this, the European Space Agency has set up a new programme element under ARTES (Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems). The "ARTES 11" programme was approved at the ministerial meeting of the ESA Council held in Berlin in December 2005 and currently eight of the Agency's Member States are participants.

Divided into two parts, the programme initially involves the development and manufacture of the first flight model of a generic bus. This work is included in the contract that was signed by Mr Giuseppe Viriglio, ESA Director of Telecommunications and Navigation, and Professor Manfred Fuchs, CEO of OHB-System AG. The platform will accommodate a payload mass of up to 300 kg with power consumption of up to 3 kW over a 15 year mission lifetime.

The programme subsequently involves the development, manufacture and launch of a first satellite mission to provide flight heritage and in-orbit demonstration for the platform. The mission payload is due to be selected around end-2007/early 2008 under an open tender process and the satellite selected is scheduled to be launched by the end of 2010.

The Small Geostationary Platform is being developed by a consortium headed by the German firm OHB with a core team line-up including LuxSpace (Luxembourg), the Swedish Space Corporation (Sweden) and Oerlikon Space (Switzerland). An industrial cooperation agreement between OHB and these companies was signed on 28 March in Berlin.

With this initiative, ESA is supporting European industry in broadening the product portfolio range on offer on the commercial telecommunication satellite market, by covering a market segment where no optimised European solutions currently exist.

Email This Article

Related Links
ESA Telecommunications
ARTES 11: Small Geostationary Satellite Initiative
Microsat and Nanosats at SpaceMart.com



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


Russia Places Order With SSTL For Satellite Platform Equipment
Guildford UK (SPX) Mar 28, 2007
World leading small satellite manufacturer Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has signed an order with the Federal State Unitary Enterprise - The Russian Research and Production Enterprise Pan-Russian Research Institute for Electromechanics (FSUE NPP VNIIEM) and Radioexport of Russia for the supply of satellite platform equipment and services for the KANOPUS Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Earth observation spacecraft.







  • NASA Medical Review Team Appointed
  • New Mexico Voters Weigh Spaceport Tax Impost
  • Researchers Uncover Protection Mechanism Of Radiation-Resistant Bacterium
  • The First Soyuz Mission Forty Years On

  • China And Russia Plan Mars Mission
  • First Steps To Mars
  • International Partnerships Plan Continued Exploration Of Mars
  • Mechanized Explorers Study The Depths, Chemistry Of Mars

  • ISRO To Launch Foreign Satellite As Primary Payload First Time
  • Arianespace Is Ready To Support The Mobile Satellite Services Industry's Future Development
  • Next Ariane 5 Takes Shape
  • Canadian Satellite Given Final Checks At Russian Launch Pad

  • DMCii To Launch New Higher-Resolution Satellite Imaging Service
  • First Greenhouse Gas Animations Produced Using Envisat SCIAMACHY Data
  • GeoEye Acquires Leading Aerial Imagery Provider From GE Oil And Gas
  • Take A Closer Look At Our Planet At The Palais De La Decouverte In Paris

  • New Horizons Shows Off Its Color Camera In Io Image
  • Alice Views Jupiter And Io
  • A Look From LEISA
  • Smash And Grab On The Edge Of Sol Billions Of Year Ago

  • Meteorites Contain Solar System Clues
  • Elusive Oxygen Molecule Finally Discovered In Interstellar Space By The Odin Satellite
  • Wealth Of New Results From AKARI Infrared Sky-Surveyor
  • Chemical Composition Of Stars In Clusters Can Tell History Of Our Galaxy

  • Dust-Busting Lunar Style
  • China Bans Firm From Selling Land On The Moon
  • What Lies Beneath
  • China May Launch First Lunar Probe Satellite In September

  • Haicom Is Proudly Announce The New HI-601VT GPS GSM Real-Time Tracker
  • Comtech To Supply Movement Tracking Systems To US Army
  • Russia Allocates $380 Million For Glonass In 2007
  • VEGA Awarded ESOC Navigation Frame Contract

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2006 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA PortalReports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additionalcopyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement