Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




TECH SPACE
Deep Web Search May Help Scientists
by Elizabeth Landau for JPL News
Pasadena CA (JPL) May 27, 2015


What you see when you do a basic Web search is only the tip of the iceberg. Most of the information is buried in the "Deep Web." JPL is collaborating on a DARPA initiative called Memex, which explores the connections between bits of information hidden in this vast ocean of content. Image courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech. For a larger version of this image please go here.

When you do a simple Web search on a topic, the results that pop up aren't the whole story. The Internet contains a vast trove of information - sometimes called the "Deep Web" - that isn't indexed by search engines: information that would be useful for tracking criminals, terrorist activities, sex trafficking and the spread of diseases. Scientists could also use it to search for images and data from spacecraft.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has been developing tools as part of its Memex program that access and catalog this mysterious online world. Researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, have joined the Memex effort to harness the benefits of deep Web searching for science. Memex could, for example, help catalog the vast amounts of data NASA spacecraft deliver on a daily basis.

"We're developing next-generation search technologies that understand people, places, things and the connections between them," said Chris Mattmann, principal investigator for JPL's work on Memex.

Memex checks not just standard text-based content online but also images, videos, pop-up ads, forms, scripts and other ways information is stored to look at how they are interrelated.

"We're augmenting Web crawlers to behave like browsers - in other words, executing scripts and reading ads in ways that you would when you usually go online. This information is normally not catalogued by search engines," Mattmann said.

Additionally, a standard Web search doesn't get much information from images and videos, but Memex can recognize what's in this content and pair it with searches on the same subjects. The search tool could identify the same object across many frames of a video or even different videos.

The video and image search capabilities of Memex could one day benefit space missions that take photos, videos and other kinds of imaging data with instruments such as spectrometers. Searching visual information about a particular planetary body could greatly facilitate the work of scientists in analyzing geological features. Scientists analyzing imaging data from Earth-based missions that monitor phenomena such as snowfall and soil moisture could similarly benefit.

Memex would also enhance the search for published scientific data, so that scientists can be better aware of what has been released and analyzed on their topics. The technology could be applied to large NASA data centers such as the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center, which makes NASA's ocean and climate data accessible and meaningful.

Memex would make PDF documents more easily searchable and allow users to more easily arrive at the information they seek. Awareness of existing publications also helps program managers to assess the impact of spacecraft data.

All of the code written for Memex is open-source. JPL is one of 17 teams working on it as part of the DARPA initiative.

Memex is related to DARPA's previous Big Data initiative called XDATA, managed by DARPA Program Manager Wade Shen. That research effort is also aimed at processing and analyzing large amounts of data, with defense, government and civilian applications. JPL was one of 24 groups involved.

"We are developing open source, free, mature products and then enhancing them using DARPA investment and easily transitioning them via our roles to the scientific community," Mattmann said.

Continuum Analytics Inc. of Austin, Texas, and Kitware Inc. of Clifton Park, New York, are partners on the JPL collaboration with Memex. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Seeing Stars Through The Cloud
London, UK (SPX) May 01, 2015
SKA Organisation and AWS are launching the AstroCompute in the Cloud grant programme to accelerate the development of innovative tools and techniques for processing, storing and analysing the global astronomy community's vast amounts of astronomic data in the cloud. Grant recipients will have access to credits for AWS cloud services over a two-year period and up to one petabyte (PB) of sto ... read more


TECH SPACE
China, Russia plan joint landing on the Moon

Google Lunar X-Prize meets Yoda

NASA's LRO Moves Closer to the Lunar Surface

European Space Agency Director Wants to Set Up a Moon Base

TECH SPACE
Science Drives NASA's Journey to Mars

NASA Begins Testing Mars Lander for Next Mission to Red Planet

Supersonic decelerator gets a lift to prepare for launch

The Supreme Council of Parachute Experts

TECH SPACE
McCarthy-Smith SPACE Act passes with broad bipartisan support

Boeing Awarded First Commercial Human Spaceflight Mission

Planetary Society's LightSail has gone silent

NASA Invites Innovative Early-Stage Technology Proposals

TECH SPACE
China Plans First Ever Landing On The Lunar Far Side

China ranked 4th among world space powers

3D printer making Chinese space suit parts

Xinhua Insight: How China joins space club?

TECH SPACE
Roundworms have the Right Stuff

ISS module relocation makes way for Commercial Crew spacecraft

NASA Begins Major Reconfiguration of International Space Station

ISS Partners Adjust Spacecraft Schedule

TECH SPACE
Recent Proton loss to push up launch costs warns manufacturer

SpaceX cleared for US military launches

Ariane 5's second launch of 2015

Air Force Certifies SpaceX for National Security Space Missions

TECH SPACE
Weather forecasts for planets beyond our solar system

Astrophysicists offer proof that famous image shows forming planets

Astronomers detect drastic atmospheric change in super Earth

New exoplanet too big for its star

TECH SPACE
Patent for Navy small space debris tracker

MaterialsLab improves how we conduct research on Earth and in Space

Deep Web Search May Help Scientists

New computational technique advances color 3D printing process




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.