Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




TECH SPACE
A simple and versatile way to build 3-dimensional materials of the future
by Staff Writers
Kyoto, Japan (SPX) Oct 20, 2014


These are electron microscopy images of the porous graphene-based structure created by diffusion driven layer-by-layer assembly. Image courtesy Kyoto University's iCeMS.

Researchers in Japan have developed a novel yet simple technique, called "diffusion driven layer-by-layer assembly," to construct graphene into porous three-dimensional (3D) structures for applications in devices such as batteries and supercapacitors. Their study was recently published in the journal Nature Communications.

Graphene is essentially an ultra-thin sheet of carbon and possesses exciting properties such as high mechanical stability and remarkable electrical conductivity. It has been touted as the next generation material that can conceivably revolutionize existing technology and energy sectors as we know them.

However, the thin structure of graphene also acts as a major obstacle for practical uses. When piecing together these tiny sheets into larger structures, the sheets easily stack with one another, resulting in a significant loss of unique material properties.

While several strategies have been proposed to deal with this sticky issue, they are often costly, time consuming, and difficult to scale up.

To overcome this challenge, the researchers from the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) at Kyoto University borrowed a principle from polymer chemistry and developed it into a technique to assemble graphene into porous 3D architectures while preventing stacking between the sheets.

By putting graphene oxide (an oxidized form of graphene) into contact with an oppositely charged polymer, the two components could form a stable composite layer, a process also known as "interfacial complexation."

"Interestingly, the polymer could continuously diffuse through the interface and induce additional reactions, which allowed the graphene-based composite to develop into thick multi-layered structures. Hence, we named this process 'diffusion driven layer-by-layer assembly'," explained Jianli Zou, a co-investigator in the project.

The resulting products display a foam-like porous structure, ideal for maximizing the benefits of graphene, with the porosity tunable from ultra-light to highly dense through simple changes in experimental conditions.

Furthermore, the process is easily scalable for creating large-area films which will be highly useful as electrodes and membranes for energy generation or storage.

"While we have only demonstrated the construction of graphene-based structures in this study, we strongly believe that the new technique will be able to serve as a general method for the assembly of a much wider range of nanomaterials," concluded Franklin Kim, the principal investigator of the study.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Unstoppable magnetoresistance
Princeton NJ (SPX) Oct 10, 2014
Mazhar Ali, a fifth-year graduate student in the laboratory of Bob Cava, the Russell Wellman Moore Professor of Chemistry at Princeton University, has spent his academic career discovering new superconductors, materials coveted for their ability to let electrons flow without resistance. While testing his latest candidate, the semimetal tungsten ditelluride (WTe2), he noticed a peculiar result. ... read more


TECH SPACE
China's ailing moon rover weakening

NASA Mission Finds Widespread Evidence of Young Lunar Volcanism

Russian Luna-25 Mission to Cost Billions

New Batch of Lunar Soil to be Delivered to Earth in 2023-2025

TECH SPACE
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Studies Comet Flyby

Mars rover had good opportunities to image passing comet

Mars One -- and done?

MAVEN spacecraft's first look at Mars holds surprises

TECH SPACE
Dava Newman nominated for NASA post

"Houston: We Have A Problem...But No Worries, Our Virtual Therapist Is On It"

Space Trips To Change World For Better: Virgin Galactic CEO

NASA Exercises Authority to Proceed with Commercial Crew Contracts

TECH SPACE
Work completed on satellite launch center in Hainan

China to launch new marine surveillance satellites in 2019

China Successfully Orbits Experimental Satellite

China's first space lab in operation for over 1000 days

TECH SPACE
CASIS Issues RFP For EO Ideas Using ISS Technology

Cosmonauts Busy as US Segment Crew Takes Day Off

ISS Astronauts Wrap Up Preps for Wednesday Spacewalk

Progress-M Cargo Ship To Undock From ISS On Oct 27

TECH SPACE
China Completes Country's Largest Spaceport

Argentina launches geostationary satellite

Arianespace's December mission for DIRECTV-14 and GSAT-16 satellites in process

Inquiry reveals design stage shortcoming in Galileo navigation system

TECH SPACE
Getting To Know Super-Earths

Astronomers Spot Faraway Uranus-Like Planet

NASA's Hubble Maps the Temperature and Water Vapor on an Extreme Exoplanet

Hubble project maps temperature, water vapor on wild exoplanet

TECH SPACE
Goldilocks principle wrong for particle assembly

LockMart Team Delivers Lightning Mapper Instrument For Weather Satellite

A simple and versatile way to build 3-dimensional materials of the future

SSL Begins Post-Launch Maneuvers For Intelsat 30




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.