Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















STELLAR CHEMISTRY
A new cosmic survey offers unprecedented view of galaxies
by Staff Writers
Princeton NJ (SPX) Mar 03, 2017


This is a color composite image in the green, red and infrared bands of a patch of the sky known as the COSMOS field, as imaged by the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii. The galaxies are seen at such large distances that the light from them has taken billions of years to reach Earth. The light from the faintest galaxies in this image was emitted when the universe was less than 10 percent of its present age. Image courtesy Princeton University/HSC Project.

The universe has come into sharper focus with the release this week of new images from the one of the largest telescopes in the world. A multinational collaboration led by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan that includes Princeton University scientists has published a "cosmic census" of a large swath of the night sky containing roughly 100 million stars and galaxies, including some of the most distant objects in the universe. These high-quality images allow an unprecedented view into the nature and evolution of galaxies and dark matter.

The images and accompanying data were collected using a digital optical-imaging camera on the Subaru Telescope, located at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii. The camera, known as Hyper Suprime-Cam, is mounted directly in the optical path, at the "prime focus," of the Subaru Telescope. A single image from the camera captures an amount of sky equal to the area of about nine full moons.

The project, known as the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program, is led by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) in collaboration with the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe in Japan, the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics in Taiwan, and Princeton University.

The release includes data from the first one-and-a-half years of the project, consisting of 61.5 nights of observations beginning in 2014. The project will take 300 nights over five to six years.

The data will allow researchers to look for previously undiscovered galaxies and to search for dark matter, which is matter that neither emits nor absorbs light but which can be detected via its effects on gravity.

A 2015 study using Hyper Suprime-Cam sur-veyed 2.3 square degrees of sky and found gravitational signatures of nine clumps of dark matter, each weighing as much as a galaxy cluster (Miyazaki et al., 2015). The current data release covers about 50 times more sky than was used in that study, showing the potential of these data to reveal the statistical properties of dark matter.

The survey consists of three layers: a Wide survey that will eventually cover an area equal to 7000 full moons, or 1400 square degrees; a Deep survey that will look farther into the universe and encompass 26 square degrees; and an UltraDeep survey that will cover 3.5 square degrees and penetrate deep into space, allowing observations of some of the most distant galaxies in the universe.

The surveys use optical and near infrared wavelengths in five broad wavelength bands (green, red, infrared, z, and y) and four narrow-band filters. In the multi-band images, the images are extremely sharp, with star images only 0.6 to 0.8 arcseconds across. (One arcsecond equals 3600th part of a degree.)

The ability to capture images from deep in space is made possible by the light-collection power of the Subaru Telescope's mirror, which has an aperture of 8.2 meters, as well as the image exposure time.

The depth into space that one can look is measured in terms of the magnitude, or brightness of objects that can be seen from Earth in a given wavelength band. The depths of the three surveys are characterized by magnitudes in the red band of 26.4, 26.6 and 27.3 in the Wide, Deep and Ultradeep data, respectively. As the survey continues, the Deep and Ultradeep surveys will be able to image fainter objects.

The Hyper Suprime-Cam contains 104 scientific charge-coupled devices (CCDs) for a total of 870 million pixels. The total amount of data taken so far comprises 80 terabytes, which is comparable to the size of about 10 million images by a typical digital camera, and covers 108 square degrees.

Because it is difficult to search such a huge dataset with standard tools, NAOJ has developed a dedicated database and interface for ease of access and use of the data.

"Since 2014, we have been observing the sky with HSC, which can capture a wide-field image with high resolution," said Satoshi Miyazaki, the leader of the project and a scientist at NAOJ.

"We believe the data release will lead to many exciting astronomical results, from exploring the nature of dark matter and dark energy, as well as asteroids in our own solar system and galaxies in the early universe. The team members are now preparing a number of scientific papers based on these data. We plan to publish them in a special issue of the Publication of Astronomical Society of Japan. Moreover, we hope that interested members of the public will also access the data and enjoy the real universe imaged by the Subaru telescope, one of the largest the world."

At Princeton, the project is co-led by Michael Strauss and Robert Lupton of the De-partment of Astrophysical Sciences. "The HSC data are really beautiful," Strauss said.

"Princeton scientists are using these data to explore the nature of merging galaxies, to search for the most distant quasars in the universe, to map the outer reaches of the Milky Way Galaxy, and for many other projects. We are delighted to make these won-derful images available to the world-wide astronomical community."

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Scientists reach back in time to discover some of the most power-packed galaxies
Clemson SC (SPX) Feb 28, 2017
When the universe was young, a supermassive black hole - bloated to the bursting point with stupendous power - heaved out a jet of particle-infused energy that raced through the vastness of space at nearly the speed of light. Billions of years later, a trio of Clemson University scientists, led by College of Science astrophysicist Marco Ajello, has identified this black hole and four other ... read more

Related Links
Princeton University
Stellar Chemistry, The Universe And All Within It

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
India has capability to develop space station, says top official

Orion spacecraft achieves key safety milestone

The NASA Imager Dentists Use Daily

Marshall shakes, packs, ships and tracks NASA payloads

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Elon Musk: tech dreamer reaching for sun, moon and stars

Moon tourists risk rough ride, experts say

ULA launches NROL-79 payload for NRO

SpaceX says it will fly civilians to the moon next year

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
New evidence for a water-rich history on Mars

NASA Orbiter Steers Clear of Mars Moon Phobos

Remnants of a mega-flood on Mars

Mars is more Earth-like than moon-like

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Riding an asteroid: China's next space goal

China's 1st cargo spacecraft to make three rendezvous with Tiangong-2

Thinking Big: China Hopes to Conduct 2nd Mission to Mars by 2030

China to Conduct Test Flight of CZ-8 Carrier Rocket by 2018

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Iridium Safety Voice Communications Installs Surge Past 500 Aircraft

Turkey Moves Closer to Launching Own Space Agency

OneWeb, Intelsat merge to advance satellite internet

GomSpace to supply satellites for Sky and Space Global constellation

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Aireon and Thales Begin Validation of Space-Based ADS-B Data

Scientists demonstrate improved particle warning to protect astronauts

Raytheon gets $1 billion radar contract for Qatar

New use for paper industry's sludge and fly ash in plastics

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Hunting for giant planet analogs in our own backyard

Faraway Planet Systems Are Shaped Like the Solar System

Biochemical 'fossil' shows how life may have emerged without phosphate

The missing link in how planets form

STELLAR CHEMISTRY
Juno to remain in current orbit at Jupiter

Europa Flyby Mission Moves into Design Phase

NASA receives science report on Europa lander concept

New Horizons Refines Course for Next Flyby




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement