Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
. 24/7 Space News .




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



TECH SPACE
A new bio-ink for 3-D printing with stem cells
by Staff Writers
Bristol UK (SPX) Jun 28, 2016


This is an artist's impression of bioprinting in action. It's a rapidly emerging technique for the building of living 3-D tissue constructs. Image courtesy University of Bristol. For a larger version of this image please go here.

The new stem cell-containing bio ink allows 3D printing of living tissue, known as bio-printing. The new bio-ink contains two different polymer components: a natural polymer extracted from seaweed, and a sacrificial synthetic polymer used in the medical industry, and both had a role to play.

The synthetic polymer causes the bio-ink to change from liquid to solid when the temperature is raised, and the seaweed polymer provides structural support when the cell nutrients are introduced.

Lead researcher Dr Adam Perriman, from the School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, said: "Designing the new bio-ink was extremely challenging. You need a material that is printable, strong enough to maintain its shape when immersed in nutrients, and that is not harmful to the cells. We managed to do this, but there was a lot of trial and error before we cracked the final formulation.

"The special bio-ink formulation was extruded from a retrofitted benchtop 3D printer, as a liquid that transformed to a gel at 37?C, which allowed construction of complex living 3D architectures."

The team were able to differentiate the stem cells into osteoblasts - a cell that secretes the substance of bone (and chondrocytes) cells that have secreted the matrix of cartilage and become embedded in it - to engineer 3D printed tissue structures over five weeks, including a full-size tracheal cartilage ring.

Dr Perriman said: "What was really astonishing for us was when the cell nutrients were introduced, the synthetic polymer was completely expelled from the 3D structure, leaving only the stem cells and the natural seaweed polymer. This, in turn, created microscopic pores in the structure, which provided more effective nutrient access for the stem cells.

The team's findings, featured on the cover of Advanced Healthcare Materials, could eventually lead to the ability to print complex tissues using the patient's own stem cells for surgical bone or cartilage implants, which in turn could used in knee and hip surgeries.

'3D Bioprinting Using a Templated Porous Bioink' by James P. K. Armstrong, Madeline Burke, Benjamin M. Carter, Sean A. Davis, and Adam W. Perriman in Advanced Healthcare Materials.

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
University of Bristol
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
TECH SPACE
Innovative device allows 3-D imaging of the breast with less radiation
Newport News VA (SPX) Jun 22, 2016
Preliminary tests have demonstrated that a new device may enable existing breast cancer imagers to provide up to six times better contrast of tumors in the breast, while maintaining the same or better image quality and halving the radiation dose to patients. The advance is made possible by a new device developed for 3D imaging of the breast by researchers at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jef ... read more


TECH SPACE
Russian Moon Base to Hold Up to 12 People

US may approve private venture moon mission: report

Fifty Years of Moon Dust

Airbus Defence and Space to guide lunar lander to the Moon

TECH SPACE
Curiosity rover analysis suggests Mars has oxygen-rich history

NASA Scientists Discover Unexpected Mineral on Mars

Hardware for Journey to Mars is a 'Big Catch'

Opportunity Wraps up Work on 'Wheel Scuff'

TECH SPACE
Blue Origin has fourth successful rocket booster landing

TED Talks aim for wider global reach

Disney brings its brand to Shanghai with new theme park

Tech, beauty intersect in Silicon Valley

TECH SPACE
China's newest rocket ready for blast-off

China preparing for new era of space economy

China to send Chang'e-4 to south pole of moon's far-side

Experts Fear Chinese Space Station Could Crash Into Earth

TECH SPACE
Down to Earth: Returned astronaut relishes little things

NASA Ignites Fire Experiment Aboard Space Cargo Ship

A Burial Plot for the International Space Station

Three astronauts touch down after 6 months in space

TECH SPACE
LSU Chemistry Experiment Aboard Historic Suborbital Space Flight

Spaceflight contracts India's PSLV to launch 12 Planet Dove nanosats

Purdue experiment aboard Blue Origin suborbital rocket a success

Ariane 5 delivers its heaviest commercial payload

TECH SPACE
Newborn Planet Discovered Around Young Star

NASA's K2 Finds Newborn Exoplanet Around Young Star

"Electric Wind" Can Strip Earth-Like Planets of Oceans and Atmospheres

San Francisco State University astronomer helps discover giant planet orbiting 2 suns

TECH SPACE
A new bio-ink for 3-D printing with stem cells

Huge helium discovery 'a life-saving find'

Unveiling the distinctive features of a promising industrial microorganism

Scientists consider building cities of the future out of bone




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement