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. BT Offers Transatlantic Drag And Drop Video File Transfer Via Satellite

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Washington DC - Apr 08, 2004
BT Broadcast Services (BTBS), the broadcast and media solutions arm of BT, and Pathfire, the leading supplier of digital content distribution and management solutions, announce the launch of BT Mediarelay, a ground-breaking new transatlantic video file transfer (VFT) service.

BT Mediarelay will offer a fast, secure, easy-to-use, and cost-effective alternative to distributing broadcast content via videotapes or by linear satellite services. Using a simple drag-and-drop PC interface to queue files for transfer, BT Mediarelay requires no technical knowledge to operate and streamlines the process of transferring content, giving complete control to users.

Bringing together BT Broadcast Services' robust global telecommunications capabilities with Pathfire's innovative and widely deployed Digital Media Gateway distribution and management platform, BT Mediarelay is expected to revolutionize transatlantic content delivery.

The new service will allow BTBS' European and global customer base to connect to over 1,000 Pathfire- enabled broadcast television stations in the USA. As a result, broadcast content owners, news providers, advertising agencies and film production companies will be able to quickly and easily send and receive video content within and between both networks, opening up new markets and commercial opportunities for content.

Paul Claydon, Head of New Product Development at BT Broadcast Services, said, "Pathfire's solutions are already widely deployed in the US, creating enormous efficiencies for its users. By offering a transatlantic service, we are seeking to extend this capability, while laying the foundations for new commercial and production opportunities throughout the television, film and advertising industries.

"We already have a lot of interest from international broadcasters and content owners, keen to take advantage of a service that makes sending and receiving video content as simple as using email."

A subsequent development phase will include a local server allowing, for example, a news broadcaster to operate a 48-hour archive of recent news reports for on-demand retrieval. Users taking content will be able to browse the local server, then dub off the video file to tape or direct to an editing or play-to-air server.

Content owners utilizing the system in this way can instantly see what is popular, enabling them to tailor output and, consequently, increase the value of their service to broadcasters.

Brad Ferris, VP Business Development at Pathfire, added, "This is the most complete VFT service of its kind and will open up a powerful new conduit that allows the seamless transfer of content between Europe or North America, in the shortest possible time.

BT Mediarelay along with Pathfire will lay the foundation for international store and forward delivery of broadcast media. This demonstrates Pathfire's commitment to expanding the value of store and forward delivery via video file transfer not just in the United States but internationally, as well."

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Web-Based Education Limited By Publishers' Restrictions
 Washington - Apr 07, 2004
Publishers rather than course directors could end up determining the core content of medical web-based courses, according to an article published this week in BMC Medical Education. Studies published in Open Access journals, or in journals with well-organised and liberal permissions policies are more likely to make it onto course reading lists.
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